African American Reparations Archives




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 13, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


February 13, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 13, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


February 13, 2017


February 13, 2017


Dr. Rosie Milligan
Publisher, Author, Founder of

Black Writers on Tour



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, April 10, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


April 10, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, April 10, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


April 10, 2017


April 10, 2017


Oneita Jackson
Author of

Letters From Mrs. Grundy
Nappy-Headed Negro Syndrome



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, March 20, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


March 20, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, March 20, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


March 20, 2017


March 20, 2017

Shannon Tubbs

Author of

History Is A Part of Me
A Hip Hop Poem of African American Inventors: Educational Activity



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 13, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


February 27, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 27, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


February 27, 2017


February 27, 2017


Dr. Maxine Thompson
Publisher, Author, Founder of

Maxine Thompson Literary and Educational Services
Author of
Affirmations and Essays for Melanoid People



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 13, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


February 13, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 13, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


February 13, 2017


February 13, 2017


Dr. Rosie Milligan
Publisher, Author, Founder of

Black Writers on Tour



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html

The Katrina Blues

Love Story

Blog: Hurricane Katrina: 11th Anniversary Revisited

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

http://www.maxinethompson.com

http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Today is the 11th anniversary of #hurricaneKatrina; copy of The Katrina Blues by Maxine Thompson. http://amzn.to/2byNB57

My novella, The Katrina Blues, was written about 10 years ago. I was deeply disturbed at seeing people who looked like me in a flood on roofs, thirsty, and being treated like Third World refugees. I’ve witnessed racism all of my life, but this was an event which struck a chord. What a precarious position my people live in. And what an omen of things to come.

As a writer, I wrote “The Katrina Blues” as a love story against this backdrop in Black American history. It was published, even made a Best seller’s list as part of an anthology on the now defunct Black Expressions’ Book Club.

The 11th anniversary is here. Things have gotten worse. Black lives matter, yet Black/Brown blood is running in the street. Trayvon Martin. Mike Brown. Tamir Rice. Eric Garner. Sandra Bland. Alton Sterling. Philandro Castille. Koryn Gaines. Charles Kinsey.

How do we establish a system of justice? This is a question that we, as Black writers, need to explore.

Here’s the back cover.

Meet Deni Richards, a Los Angeles attorney, who appears to have everything. She has an expensive Mercedes, a condo in an exclusive neighborhood, and a job at The Los Angeles Children’s Court. But after a public disgrace at the altar, she is left heartbroken, bereft, and lonely. Her professional titles and material possessions do little to heal her heart.

In the Ninth Ward of New Orleans, a talented Jazz saxophonist, Coleman Blue, is getting his heart smashed in one of the most unspeakable betrayals a man can imagine.

Fast-forward one year later, on August 29, 2005, when Hurricane Katrina hits New Orleans, it affects people throughout the United States.

Follow the journey of two unlikely people who meet, and, although they are complete opposites, tragedy brings them together in a common ground of love.

Sign up for the free newsletter at http://www.maxinethompson.com or http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com.

About the blogger: About the Blogger: Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. As an editor, she has edited numerous best-selling books for African Americans, including many books for men and women who are incarcerated in the prison system. In a down economy, as a literary agent, she has negotiated over 100 book deals for African Americans. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), a contributor to bestselling anthologies Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club best-seller, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, Novellas, The Katrina Blues, and Capri’s Second Chance, contributor to Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a small Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012. LA Blues 3 was published in August 2013.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 8, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


August 8, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 8, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


August 8, 2016

Judson Bacot
Author of

The Evolution of America’s Homebred Terrorist: The Changing Culture an Indisputable, Comprehensive, Provocative Scrutiny Into the Makings and World of America’s Urban Terrorist


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


The Power of Voice: An Artist in the Midst of War

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

“Those who commit the murders, write the reports.” Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells was an activist and a journalist. According to Wikipedia: She was born into slavery in 1862, but as an adult, she documented lynching in the United States in the 1890s, showing that it was often used as a way to control or punish blacks who competed with whites, rather than being based on criminal acts by blacks, as was usually claimed by whites. Needless to say, she had a voice at a time when it was dangerous for a black person, a woman at that, to have a voice.

In that vein, I never realized how important my voice was until I lost mine after a thyroid surgery in 2008…. We’re not talking laryngitis, either. Have you ever tried to ask for directions when you sound like a fog horn, and the mailman can’t understand you? Or, have you tried to order a fast-food take-out over the drive-through window speaker when your voice won’t go up enough decibels for the person on the other end to hear you? Or, better yet, have you ever hosted an Internet radio show where you sound horrible, and you know it, but you have to move on because this is part of your calling? Talk about frustrating, and that was only my literal voice. How about my voice in the world?

Well, it started me to thinking about how so many African American authors, who weren’t given a chance to get published back through the years, even up through the 80s, and early 90s, (I was one of them), have now been given a voice. Many have self-published to get their words, their voice, so to speak, out to the world. I know I did. Eventually, I sold 6 books to other publishers, but now I’m relaunching my books under my own company.

Anyhow, some African Americans have been published through traditional, mainstream publishers, but the point is, we now have a voice. The Internet and social media have opened a lot of doors, too. Over the past 8 years, with President Barack Obama as our first African American Chief of Staff, we saw how important the voice of the people can be when we united.

Now we are living in an even more treacherous time, much of which is being documented through technology and social media. But as writers, we need to document. The power of the pen still reigns.

Whether the media forgets, we should never forget. Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Alva Braziel, Delrawn Smalls Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, and on the anniversary of Sandra Bland’s death, everything is the same. Let’s not forget Trayvon Martin, either. Do you recall any convictions for these murder victims? Do you expect to see any convictions for the more recent murder victims, Alton Sterling, Philandro Castile, which were captured on video and live streamed for the world to see? Or more recently, Charles Kinsey, a behavior therapist, who was shot by police Monday, 7-18-16, with his hands held up in the air. Will there be any conviction?

What should we do as writers? We write. My business philosophy, taken from my old job at the Los Angeles County Department of Children Services, is, “If you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen.” For example, if a child was injured or killed in a foster home, or in its parent’s home, and the authorities couldn’t find any documentation in your case, indicating you had made all reasonable efforts to supervise and protect that child, you were in deep trouble.

Likewise, if you don’t write what you are seeing happening here in the United States, you are just as involved in the complicity of these crimes we see around us.

Our job, as a writer, involves taking a stand. What is going on in America is wrong. Systemic racism is wrong. This involves all of its offshoots—mass incarceration of Blacks, poverty, redlining, racial profiling, police brutality, miseducation, and lack of reparations for our ancestors who provided the free labor which built the wealth of this country.

On my last radio show, 7-18-16, where I interviewed 21-year-old author, Terrence R. McCrae, who penned the book, “What Should We All do After the Trayvon Martin Trial?” I’ve cited other books which, (along with the Underground Railroad, abolitionists, and the fact slavery was morally wrong,) helped end slavery. These books include, but are not limited to, David Walker’s Appeal (written in 1829,) Frederick Douglass’s narrative, My Bondage and My Freedom, and even a white writer’s novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe. In the 20th century, another white writer, the late Harper Lee, addressed racism in the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, in the brilliant summation given by the attorney’s character, Atticus Finch. One of the best books of the 20th Century, which addressed the internal devastation (yet the triumph of the human spirit) of slavery, was Pulitzer Prize-Winning novel, Beloved, by Toni Morrison.

Let’s face it. We’re in a war. A war on our community. As artists, this is definitely a time that the power of the written word is just as powerful as YouTube, Periscope, and other social media outlets.

Let us never forget. If you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen. I always see it on a deeper level. Without writing our passage down, “we,” as a people, didn’t happen.

About the Blogger: Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. As an editor, she has edited numerous best-selling books for African Americans, including many books for men and women who are incarcerated in the prison system. In a down economy, as a literary agent, she has negotiated over 100 book deals for African Americans. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell, a contributor to bestselling anthologies Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club best-seller, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, Novellas, The Katrina Blues, Capri’s Second Chance, and Summer of Salvation, contributor to Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a small Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012. LA Blues 3 was published in August 2013.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


July 18, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


July 18, 2016

Terrence R. McCrea
Author of

What Should We All Do After The Trayvon Martin Trial?


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


Blog: Self-Publishing (Indie Publishing): The New Middle Passage <p>

(Originally published in 2000; Taken from The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sells (2002)

By Dr. Maxine Thompson)

http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

“When you walk in purpose, you collide with destiny.”

Pastor Ralph Buchanan

In 1992, when I wrote my poem, “The Middle Passage,” I was a frustrated, overworked
social worker with a caseload of 80 children—too many of them being termed as “crack
babies.” These babies were the offspring of the majority of my African American,
formerly known as “South Central” Los Angeles substance-abusing clients/brothers/sisters.

Having lost many of my childhood friends to this same demon—drug addiction—who
knows how much genius has been lost—I think I’ve been on a mission to reclaim all
that lost talent ever since. There’s a saying, “Let your misery become your ministry,
and your mess become your message.”

Although I hadn’t seen Julie Dash’s film, Daughters of the Dust, at the time I penned my
poem, I believe the ancestors inspired “The Middle Passage.”

“We are the children of those who chose to survive,” the matriarchal grandmother,
Nana Peasant, says in Dash’s movie, Daughters of the Dust.

One day, after seeing one more drug baby fight for his life on an inhalator, I had had enough. In anger, I sat down and wrote this poem. I saw a connection between the two figurative “middle
passages.” The slaves had no choice over being in captivity, just as these innocent
“drug addicted babies” had no choice over their mother’s addiction. For these
newborns, the spiritual and physical “middle passage” from their mother’s womb to their first breath was as fraught with peril as “the middle passage” was for their historical counterpart–the
African ancestors who traveled “the middle passage” from Africa to the islands, and the
continents of South and North America. Perhaps I was giving vent to the ancestors’
sense of sorrow.

One thing for sure, though, when I wrote this poem, I had no idea that 9 years later, a
woman, Gloria Battle, an angel (as I called her,) on my path of enlightenment, would read
my poem in a college class and later invite me to Sodus, New York to speak to young people and to conduct a self-publishing workshop. I call this a case of synchronicity.
Gloria Battles was part of God’s answer to my desire to get out and do workshops.

Gloria Battles, a volunteer and community activist, was one of the founding members of the Imani Festival in Sodus, New York. Sodus is located in Northern New York near Rochester, and only had a small Black population. Mrs. Battle worked hard to keep cultural awareness going in this city.

Following a thirteen-hour trek from Los Angeles, to Rochester, due to plane delays and
computer failures on the rerouted plane, I finally arrived safely at 1:00 a.m. (This was
the first real problem encountered since becoming a frequent flier–a big switch from my cocoon as a former hate-to-fly person.) Anyhow, Gloria Battle, along with her husband, were there to meet me. They drove me out to a rural area nearly an hour away and by 3:00 a.m., I was happily deposited in my hotel.

The next day, after my workshop with a group of teenagers and teachers, when Mrs. Battle took me sightseeing, I found the Sodus/Rochester area reminded me of a pastoral
painting filled with roaming fields, land unblemished by buildings and open expanse. We visited The Village of Sodus Point where the wealthy sail their yachts and own
summer homes. The historical Sodus Bay Light House, now a museum, gave a
breathtaking view of Lake Erie, which had a glassy sheen that looked almost like
turquoise in the afternoon sun.

But what impressed me most about the setting was the sense of history and its personal
message it sent to me. My trip to Sodus, New York was not just a business trip as I’d
thought. It provided a spiritual solution to a dilemma I was facing.

How did this happen? I believe what I experienced came about because the place
brought back the ancestral memory of the past. I found out Rochester was one of the
final ports of the Underground Railroad. Rochester was also where Harriet Tubman
brought slaves en route to “Freedom.” This was also the home of abolitionists.
Moreover, Susan B. Anthony formed the woman’s suffragette movement here.
Frederick Douglas founded the North Star newspaper here. Obviously, Rochester has a
rich heritage of social activists for freedom, and the feeling seems to linger in the soil.

It was no accident that I stayed in a hotel by the Erie Canal, which was used for
runaway slaves to escape into Canada. When I strolled along the Erie Canal, it was as
though the ancestor’s spirit returned to me to remind me of the responsibility I have as
a writer/epublisher/literary service person—that I am to call writers to “Freedom.” I
realize, now, I am standing on the backs of my ancestors, who opened the way for this
day of literary freedom.

I’ve often read that the runaway slaves were told to follow the star pattern of the
drinking gourd, or the Big Dipper, which led north. Similarly, I learned that what
explorers called true north was about the journey. True North, in fact, is your authentic
journey through life. I started out thinking my authentic journey was just to be a writer,
and to get published. Now I’ve learned, along the way, that I have a greater calling. I
am trying to point writers True North.

Just as Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglas helped free enslaved Blacks both in
body and mind, I have a ministry to help free new writers (many of them African
Americans) from not publishing their works. This destiny for me is just as important of
a calling as when I worked with abused, neglected children for twenty-three years.

Later, when I returned to Los Angeles, I dreamed of my mentor, Dr. Rosie Milligan’s
bookstore, being flooded in a foot or so of water. Strangely, a disembodied hand floated
in the water. When I shared my dream, she interpreted it as “the helping hand”—a
symbol of what publishing books provide for a drowning people.

Of course, this dream started me thinking. Just as The Underground Railroad was the
freedom train, self-publishing, now called indie publishing, has become the new “freedom train.” It helps authors retain a sense of ownership of the material, and to retain control over the process. Of course, there’s the money, too, for those with marketing savvy. Now, books can be sold domestically and internationally and through many digital outlets such as Apple, Kobo, and others.

But the real reason we gain freedom is that literature and books are the repositories of our culture.

Think about it. The Dark Ages in history began because books were banned. In slavery, reading
was forbidden for Blacks. After manumission, and throughout the twentieth century, as
Blacks, we’ve had several waves of “Literary Dark Ages,” starting from the demise of
Harlem Renaissance in the 20s and 30s. There’s a lesson in the past. It would behoove
many of us never to be lulled into a false sense of security and forget. It’s no secret that
self-published Black writers are fueling the new wave of African American literature.

For the first time in history, on a growing level, (due to the Internet, desktop publishing,
ePublishing, and Print on Demand, social media), we, as Black writers, have a chance to explore our
journey as part of the African Diaspora here in the United States and other lands.

The insight I gained from this trip to Rochester, New York was two-fold. The message
to my personal dilemma was this: although I’m writing my latest novel, I can continue
to help other writers. At the same time, I realize that helping “birth” or “mid-wife” a
book is the same spiritual “middle passage” that giving birth to a new life is. This time
around, I am writing about “The Middle Passage,” not in a pejorative sense, but in a
positive one. Self-publishing or Indie Publishing can be seen as a “middle passage” for aspiring African American writers. At least this time, we have a choice about the journey.

Contact Dr. Maxine Thompson at maxtho@aol.com or bbutterfly1951@gmail.com If you would like assistance with writing, publishing, or marketing your book.

THE MIDDLE PASSAGE


Ever wondered how the ancestors survived

the boat ride from Africa to America?

Smells of everybody’s lives jumbled together

as they lay flanked side by side, in a cesspool

of blood, tears, and stool, dreaming the undreamable.

Deep in the bowels of a slave ship,

where many made their tomb,

a mother’s tears flowed from dried-eyed ducts,

for the suckling babe snatched from her breast,

while hating the enemy whose seed now grew in her womb.

Rattlings of shackles never quite able

to drown out the re-memory of sun-drenched savannahs

where they once roamed as kings and queens

pulverized the spirit. . .

Were they bludgeoned into mindless stupor?

Or did they tell themselves,

“We must be strong; we must survive

for our future sons and daughters”?

For survive they did…only to endure the unwriteable…

bondage…false freedom…lynchings…now drugs…

Ever wondered what the ancestors would believe

if they knew of the perilous journey their future seed

must fork through the middle passage

from their mother’s crack-filled womb?

Deep in the caverns of an incubator,

where many make their tomb,

a drug baby’s life shackled to tubes, ventilators,

not guaranteed to save, like mother’s milk, an umbilical cord,

but an alien world…Now, who’s the slave?

Maxine E. Thompson, 1992

Email: maxtho@aol.com

About the blogger:

Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell, a contributor to bestselling anthologies Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club best seller, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, Novellas, The Katrina Blues, Capri’s Second Chance, and Summer of Salvation, contributor to Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a small Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012. LA Blues 3 was published in August 2013.

For your website needs, contact SG Creations at Stupid Site.Website, graphics, promotional material, etc :D