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Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows

This Week’s Guest – Monday, September 18, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


September 18, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Dr. Maxine Thompson will be the Guest – Monday, September 18, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the host or Dr. Maxine Thompson


September 18, 2017


September 18, 2017


Fran Lewis
Author of

A Daughter’s Promise



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Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 8, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


August 8, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 8, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


August 8, 2016

Judson Bacot
Author of

The Evolution of America’s Homebred Terrorist: The Changing Culture an Indisputable, Comprehensive, Provocative Scrutiny Into the Makings and World of America’s Urban Terrorist


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Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


Season of Terrorism

Like the rest of America, I’m sitting here saddened, numb and appalled by this last massacre, which took place in a historic Black church in Charleston, South Carolina. This violence was, by the perpetrator’s own admission, a hate crime.

We talk about terrorism since 9-11, but what about the terrorism we’re witnessing now in the past several years of police and citizens killing innocent people on American soil? What happened to America, the land of the free?

Well, I just want to know. Is it open season on killing Black people? Has having a Black President made racism rear its ugly head in a way that was never shown before when racism was underground and subtle after the Civil Rights Movement? How can a 21 year old have so much hatred for Black people that he would go to an iconic church in Charleston, South Carolina, sit in their Bible Study for one hour, then shoot 9 people, unless he learned it? Did he learn to hate Blacks at the dinner table? Is he a microcosm of white society’s low grade infection called racism that metastasizes into a cancer of violence?

These are just some of the questions swirling in my head.

One thing I’ve noticed is that when Blacks commit heinous crimes, the media even covers it differently. They’re already trying to say that the killer, Dylan Roof, has mental problems, when there has been no indication of it before now. Roof allegedly had planned this for 6 months.

Think about it. When law enforcement caught Christopher Dorner, the black police killer, (who wrote the Manifesto), after a manhunt, they burnt him to a crisp in a San Bernardino cabin. I’m not excusing Dorner’s crime, but there was no kindly putting him in the car, or kindly walking him up onto a plane like they did this young white boy, Dylan Roof. Christopher Dorner, who was shooting back, was not given due process, an arrest, or a trial. Somehow, his killing and subsequent burning by the police/sheriffs just seemed a little reminiscent of lynching.

To paraphrase President Obama, ”We refuse to accept that guns have become the New Normal,” but when will Congress pass laws to do something about gun violence?

My condolences and prayers go out to the families of the victims. I love the forgiveness that the survivors of the deceased relatives have shown Dylan Roof. I applaud the fact the people of all races in Charleston, South Carolina are showing that love can conquer hate, and there are good people of all races in the world. But times like this makes one afraid for your family, if you are Black.

Immediate Release

Contact:
Dr. Maxine Thompson (323)242-9917
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com
http//www.maxinethompson.com
Hollywood Blues Trailer: http://youtu.be/NlpQS18oE7U

Former Social Worker and Former Foster Child Producing Film Based on an African American Family Raised in the Foster Care System

In the era of globalization, we still have people of color, in the other parts of the world, who think that African Americans don’t experience any disenfranchisement, racism, poverty, or discrimination as they do in their counterparts of the world. Particularly, since we have a Black President, people think African Americans live in a post-racial era.

Hollywood Blues, (screenplay written by Villalobos Odell Body, Executive Producer, based on novel, LA Blues by Maxine Thompson, Co-Producer) dispels that myth as it takes a look at dark, unexplored narratives here in Los Angeles. We’ve seen a male perspective in films, Training Day, Boyz n the Hood, and Menace to Society, but we’ve never seen the underbelly of LA from a Black female perspective.

Hollywood Blues is a tale of a woman, Zipporah Soldano, aka Z, who, as a result of her mother being imprisoned, grows up in foster care, then later becomes an LAPD officer. Some of the issues covered in the film will deal with domestic violence, (#whyIstayed), women in prison, The LA 1992 riots, the foster care system, LA Black/Hispanic gangs, police corruption, Mothers of Murdered Children, and stop the violence movements. .

Although the LA Blues storyline took place in 2007-2008, these are reasons these issues still persist:

-Approximately 12%-13% of the American population is African-American, but they make up 40% of the almost 2.1 million male inmates in jail or prison (U.S. Department of Justice, 2009).[1] Census data for 2000 of the number and race of all individuals incarcerated in the United States revealed a wide racial disproportion of the incarcerated population in each state: the proportion of blacks in prison populations exceeded the proportion among state residents in twenty states; the percent of blacks incarcerated was five times greater than the resident population. For example, around 50% of Washington D.C.’s black young men are currently spending time behind bars. 1,000 people get arrested each month in our nation’s capital for dealing marijuana. But they are almost all young, black men. The impact to their future is significant. These men can lose college assistance, their driver’s license, their job, even custody of their children.

-Nationally, 400,540 children spent time in the foster care system during the 2011 Federal fiscal year (October 1st through September 30th). For race demographics, there are more children of color in the system compared to the overall U.S. population, but child abuse and neglect occur at about the same rate in all ethnic groups.

- http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/. February, 2012 Black females had an imprisonment rate nearly three times that of white females.

-Black and Mexican gangs continue to war. (May 2014) MEXICANS AND BLACKS KILLING EACH OTHER IN LOS ANGELES GANG WAR TIME: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MjSmgor5Dw

-The Trayvon Martin case and the Michael Brown case, which are just the more publicized cases showing ongoing police brutality.

Therefore, telling stories that reflect our different realities 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement are necessary. Hollywood Blues is a story of triumph and healing. We don’t just want to look at the problem, but to see how in adversity, there is a seed of opportunity. We want to inspire other foster children to be over comers like the main character, Z.

For radio interviews or print, contact Dr. Maxine Thompson at 323-342-9917 or email: maxtho@aol.com; or contact Villalobos Odell Body at 323-313-6068, or email: dale.body@gmail.com.

###

Dr. Maxine Thompson
maxtho@aol.com
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, September 15, 2014


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


September 15, 2014


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, September 15, 2014

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


September 15, 2014

Dale O’Body.
Producer/Screenwriter/ of


“Hollywood Blues”


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Divas of Literature

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


Hollywood Blues Trailer: Calling All Angels

Hollywood Blues Trailer: http://youtu.be/NlpQS18oE7U

http://hollywoodbluesfilm.com
Hollywood_Blues_EPak_d2

We are looking for sponsors and partners that want to reach the strong women’s market through the independent film, Hollywood Blues, based on the novel, LA Blues, by Maxine Thompson, which has been sold on Black Expressions Book Club in hard back, and internationally for almost 2 years. The screenplay was written by Executive Producer, Villalobos Odell Body.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 25, 2014


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


August 25, 2014


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 25, 2014

Email dj@artistfirst.com for questions for the author


August 25, 2014

Minister Bryant Keith Williams, Sr.
Author of



The Ugly Side of America:
A Society that Still Devalues Black Men


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Divas of Literature

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com or maxtho@sbcglobal.net

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


Happy Father’s Day: You don’t have to be “Father Knows Best” to be a Good Father

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

I grew up in the 1950s in Detroit, Michigan, where everyone we saw on TV was Caucasian. I was an avid reader, and all but two Black books I read before the age of 17, were peopled by all white characters. Just as there were no Black fathers in the books I read, there were no positive images of Black men (let alone fathers) in films or TV, unless they were butlers, tap dancers, or buffoons. (Calhoun, Catfish, from the TV show “Amos n’ Andy” come to mind.)

At any rate, I grew up watching positive images of white fathers on popular TV shows such as, “Father’s Knows Best,” “Donna Reed” and “Leave it to Beaver.” These fathers were perfect, and looking back, they weren’t even real in a perfect white world, let alone a Black world.

Unfortunately, though, at the time, I used to inwardly compare my father to these TV versions of fatherhood. I used to sit and wonder why my father wasn’t like those fathers. Why didn’t he come home in a suit, and why wasn’t he always filled with words of wisdom?

My memories of my father were conflicted because he was complex and he was flawed. Unlike the fathers on TV who worked somewhere in an office, my father came home covered in dry mud. Nonetheless, as children, my brother and I enjoyed helping unlace his caked shoe strings from his brogan boots as he sat in his arm chair, because he worked all day doing something mysteriously called “construction work. “

At the age of six, he taught me to swim when I almost jumped in 10 feet of water, so that I always remembered –that he could save me. He often took our family for rides in rich neighborhoods, to show us possibility.

What I recall most is that my father was the man of our house. Out in the white man’s world, he didn’t have a big title, but at our house, he was unspoken, and unchallenged, as “The man.” He chose the TV channel the six kids watched, whenever we sat around our little black and white TV, which only had about 2 channels. My mother always set his plate before him, and she waited on him. He always led the family prayer at dinner, (which we sat down and ate as a family), but he didn’t seem to go to church. He was the total opposite of my mother, who seemed serious all the time, whereas he was the happy-go-lucky one. As a child, I often sided with my father when there were arguments.

Because my mother was the center of the family during our childhood and adulthood, I tried to get to know my father, as a person, after she died.

After my mother’s death, my father told me of Black Wall Street and gave me a book by Wilson Wallace. He told me of the Tulsa riots, since he was born in Oklahoma. But I have to say, my favorite thing my father gave me came in my childhood. I used to love eavesdropping on his story telling. (Children were seen, not heard, in my day.) This was the oral tradition. My father was a great raconteur. To this day, I love stories. I write them, I edit them, and hopefully, will one day help produce them as films.

Now, as an older woman, looking back on the recession/discrimination/poverty I grew up in the 1950s, I am glad my father didn’t get discouraged, then walk off and leave our family. In our neighborhood, many men couldn’t stand the pressures of Apartheid Detroit in the 1950s, the high unemployment rate, or the coming from the Jim Crow south, as my father did. Many just couldn’t stand up to the pressures of Black fatherhood, and left. As a construction worker, my father was often layed off, but somehow, we made it, as a family. I have 4 brothers who never went to prison, yet who grew up in a neighborhood where many black males became convicts. All six of us older sibs (I have a younger sister who was born when we were all nearly grown), finished high school in a neighborhood where there were many dropouts; all my brothers went into the service, and one even finished college.

Although my father has been deceased over 10 years, I think of him often. I’m happy that, before he passed, he flew to California several times, and I flew to Detroit to visit each other. As my mother passed away ten years before he did, I would tell him, “This is our father-daughter bonding time.” I was even able to see him and say “good-bye” a few months before he passed, so I have a sense of closure I didn’t feel when my mother suddenly dropped dead from a heart attack in 1993.

As the years have gone by, I finally realized something. My father was not a clone of “Father’s Knows Best,” or any man from White America. I was wrong to even make the comparison. Given our history of slavery in this country, as a Black man, he wasn’t supposed to be compared to a culture who had stripped our culture.

But I am seeing something I didn’t see before. My father never let racism strip him of his humanity. He was a man. And he was a good father.

Happy Father’s day to all fathers, grandfathers, and surrogate fathers involved in their children’s lives. It makes a difference.

For this, I thank my father. Love you. Rest in peace. Happy Father’s day, Daddy.

Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Like many of Dr. Maya Angelou’s readers and fans, I was saddened to find out about her passing on 5-28-14. On that day, I was emailing back and forth with a fellow-mentor-writer, who said she had cried all day. We both agreed we felt like we had lost a dear friend. I know we all loved her poem, “Phenomenal Woman, “ which became an anthem cry for women, particularly Black women, to love themselves.

I was a young woman when I read the series of Maya Angelou’s memoirs about different phases of her colorful life, starting with I know Why the Caged Bird Sings. What I remembered being impressed with most was her transparency. Her words sent shock waves through my then stifled mind since I grew up in a period of repression and secrets. Maya Angelou opened up and went places many Black female writers hadn’t gone before in terms of self-disclosure, which included her experience of being molested at a young age.
Let me tell you where I was coming from at that time.

As a budding writer, I grew up reading only 2 black books in the fifties. Hearing the clarion cry of the turbulent 60s, in 1968, (when I was in the 12th grade,) I organized a student walkout at my high school, Oak Park High, in Oak Park, Michigan. At the time, Oak Park High only had about 100 Black students out of a student body of 1,000. Around the same time, I also penned an article in the school newspaper about the lack of relevant literature in the school system. (I referenced the Temptation’s song, “Cloud Nine,” as one of the upshots of not having Black books. I implied Black people in the ghetto were getting high to escape the racism and poverty of the real world. Hmmm.)

After reading the article, my Jewish English teacher (sadly, I can’t remember her name) added a Black Literature section to our class. This teacher personally went out and found some of the college literature that was available at that time. This was the first time I was introduced to The Autobiography of Malcolm X, the anthology, Black Voices, Richard Wright’s Native Son, and James Baldwin’s Play, Blues for Mister Charlie. I wish I could thank her.

As wonderful as this exposure was, the writers were mainly Black male. I needed something else.

Shortly thereafter, in college, I discovered Maya Angelou through her memoirs (I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, et. al.) and I finally found the voice of a woman, who was writing, who had my issues, and who was Black like me. (I was to discover the works of Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Toni Cade Bambara over the next few years.)

The good thing about reading Black literature (particularly written by women writers) was I was able to read about people who looked like me, had my concerns and had my culture informing their world view. Plus, having forerunners who were writers, helped establish a Black aesthetic for me, as a writer.

The main lesson, though, I learned from Dr. Angelou’s life is that, as writers, we can reach people that we may never meet. Unfortunately, I never personally met Dr. Maya Angelou, but I heard her words like an ancient African drum beat thrumming, first, through her books, then later, through her wise sayings on TV, on Oprah’s show, and in the different movies she was either featured in or directed, (ie.” Down in the Delta.”) I felt like I knew her spirit.

Dr. Maya Angelou gave back to the world through her writings/teachings, and, as a result, she influenced me and many other Black women. Most of all, she taught me, through example, to give back. (As an editor/literary agent, I now work with inmates across the United States through editing their books, as well as editing many other writers.)

Among the many things she taught, I learned through Dr. Angelou’s transparency and honesty in her memoirs, to write about what was uncomfortable.

I thank you, Dr. Angelou, for opening doors for other Black female writers. You will be missed, but your words will live on. We love you. Rest in peace.

  
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