Interview Archives





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows

This Week’s Guest – Monday, November 6, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


November 6, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Dr. Maxine Thompson will be the Guest – Monday, November 6, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the host or Dr. Maxine Thompson


November 6, 2017


November 6, 2017


Dr. Maxine Thompson
Author of

The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sells



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EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 20, 2015


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


July 20, 2015


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 20, 2015

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


July 20, 2015

Alma H. Bond, PH.D., Author of
Novel, Hilary Rodman Clinton On The Couch


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Sponsored by:


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January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, April 7, 2014


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other live Internet Radio show where she is a
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


April 7, 2014


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, April 7, 2014


April 7, 2014

Sarah Jakes
(Speaker, Business Woman, writer, media personality)



Debut Author of
Lost & Found
Finding Hope in the Detours of Life


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Sponsored by:


Dr. Maxine Show
is made possible by the following SPONSORS:

EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Divas of Literature

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com or maxtho@sbcglobal.net

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, March 10, 2014


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other live Internet Radio show where she is a
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


March 10, 2014


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, March 10, 2014


March 10, 2014

Theresa Campbell


Author of
Are You There, God?


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Sponsored by:


Dr. Maxine Show
is made possible by the following SPONSORS:

EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Divas of Literature

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com or maxtho@sbcglobal.net

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, December 2, 2013

http://alturl.com/64rbi


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other live Internet Radio show where she is a
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


December 2, 2013


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, December 2, 2013


December 2, 2013

Jude Bijou

Author of
Attitude Reconstruction
A Blueprint for Building a Better Life

Dr. Maxine Show


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


Dr. Maxine Show
is made possible by the following SPONSORS:

EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Divas of Literature

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com or maxtho@sbcglobal.net

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, November 25, 2013


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other live Internet Radio show where she is a
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


November 25, 2013


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, November 25, 2013


November 25, 2013

Vanessa Davis Griggs

Author of
The Other Side of Divine

Dr. Maxine Show


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


Dr. Maxine Show
is made possible by the following SPONSORS:

EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Divas of Literature

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com or maxtho@sbcglobal.net

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html




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Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday June 24, 2013


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other live Internet Radio show where she is a
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


ArtistFirst
Monday, June 24, 2013


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, June 24, 2013


June 24, 2013

Maurice Thompson

Documentary Filmmaker/Producer of
So You Wanna Be a Producer

See Trailer


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


Dr. Maxine Show
is made possible by the following SPONSORS:

EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com or maxtho@sbcglobal.net

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


A Close-Up Look At How The Elderly Are Faring

The elderly population is one of the fastest-growing population segments in the United States. How prepared are you for your golden senior years? Your latter years should be your best years. However, for many, it’s the opposite.

I can recall when our parents worked at one job until they retired, having retirement benefits and Social Security benefits. During their golden years, they were able to garden, fish, enjoy their hobbies, and spend time with their grandchildren or even babysit their grandchildren.
What happened? During the last 40 years, America shifted from a manufacturing industry to a service and information-based economy. This resulted in a heavy reliance on foreign imported products, and now, many American corporations (multinational) are outsourcing their work to a number of these countries. Take a look at any American port and you will see for yourself why the economy is struggling.

Sadly to say, jobs for the unskilled/laborers in industries such as automobile and aerospace, as well as others, have disappeared. This left the baby boomers, those born between 1946–1964, in a “canoe without a paddle trying to go upstream” state. They were left with small or no retirement benefits. Those who found work after our major industries shifted out of the U.S.A. saw their salary dropped by 50 percent or more, thus, yielding them a small Social Security benefit at their retirement age.

Social Security benefits for the average African American is between $500 to $1,000 a month, and this will not cover rent and utilities even in low-rent senior citizen housing. Now we are facing the plan to increase the minimum age for receiving Social Security benefits from 62½ years to 65 or 67 years.

Wow! What clever politician came up with this idea? I just don’t know.
When I was growing up, I recall the grandmother and/or grandfather coming to live with their children and grandchildren. Today, it’s the reverse; children have to move in with their parents. For many Blacks, the grandmother has to become caretaker for their grandchildren due to drug addiction or incarceration of their children. This brings into existence a new challenge for the elderly Blacks. Even though they are financially challenged, they cannot take advantage of senior housing because their grandchildren are living with them and children and teens are prohibited from living in senior housing.

As an elder, I am saddened as I witness the hardship and distress of our senior citizens today. I am saddened for their children who want to help their parents but cannot because of corruption and greed on the part of the “Haves” against the “Have Nots.” I hear the cry of the elderly who did everything right, abided by the rules, got their education, and now find themselves in a position of barely surviving.
Many of them are depressed, and because of their depression, isolation, and loneliness, they suffer many health challenges. For many Black elderly, the only outlet they have is the church, and when they can no longer drive or catch a bus, there is no one to come and help them get dressed and take them to church even though their entire life and socialization has been the church. So sad!

It’s time that we all start thinking, planning, and talking about our golden years. If the rapture doesn’t come and your number is not called, you will get to be a senior! So become aware of political changes, new laws that come into effect, the global and nation economy that could impact your future as a senior. Keep up with your political representatives and monitor what they are doing to protect the seniors. Write letters to your politicians regarding elderly concerns, and encourage seniors to vote because they do make a difference. Let your political representatives know that their elderly constituents are many and they want their voices heard. Let’s live life to the fullest, make preparations for becoming an elder, and our golden years will stay golden.

Being a senior citizen should not represent the ending of life but the beginning of a new one. If we plan ahead, we will have good reasons to look forward to our golden years. The scripture is right: “We perish due to lack of knowledge.” Become knowledgeable.

Dr. Rosie Milligan, minister, counselor, talk-show host, author, business consultant, estate planner, and publisher. Latest release, coauthored with her sister Clara Hunter King, ESQ.: “Departing This Life Preparations: What You Need To Know To Get Your Personal And Business Affairs In Order.” Address: 1425 W. Manchester Ave. Ste. B, Los Angeles, Calif. 90047; 323-750-3592; e-mail: Drrosie@aol.com; Web site Drrosie.com.

Step out on Faith and Pursue Your Dream

Last night (4-27-11) I watched songstress/actress Jill Scott on the Monique Show (by the way, she looks really fit!), and I remembered the first time I saw her perform in person 11 years ago. I didn’t realize at the time, I was seeing history be made. This had to be among one of the first sets Jill performed.

At the time, I was writing for the now defunct website, Netnoir, and, as being part of the press, my sister, Sonya Vann and I, were given free tickets to an exclusive Hollywood party, which was packed with movie stars.

This fortuitous event all came about because I had left my social work job in October 1997 and stepped out on faith. Because of my being self-published, interviewing authors on my website since 1998, and writing book reviews, I had been invited to write for Netnoir a year earlier.

Anyhow, when this young woman, who wore an Afro, and crooned in a Nina Simone-sultry voice, sang, “The Way?” I knew she had a unique sound. I had no idea what a stellar career was being launched.

On Tuesday night, 4-26-11, on Monique’s show, Tyler Perry was the guest. I only caught the last 30 minutes of the show, but, of, course, I wanted to hear the interview. That previous Sunday afternoon, I’d gone to see “Madea’s Happy Family” in order to escape the pressures of being a caregiver. I needed to laugh and enjoy myself.

Well,after almost running up the movie theater aisle screaming in tears at one scene, then, within minutes later, almost rolling in the floor with laughter at another satire scene, I wanted to hear what Mr. Perry had to say.

I discovered something new. Tyler Perry employs 400 people at his movie studio, and, just to name a few, has been able to donate large sums of money to disasters such as Haiti and Katrina. Thus, I realized how important having and following a dream can be. It can provide a living for yourself, as well as others. Isn’t that what the government is saying we need—new job creation?

What if Jill Scott and Tyler Perry hadn’t pursued their dreams?

In my case, I never knew how far pursuing my self-publishing dream would take me. It has taken me to Internet radio in the virtual global world for over 9 years, and literally, it has taken me as far as China. Recently, it’s even afforded me the opportunity to contract out work to other editors. I also just signed the 67 literary contract for Brian W. Smith, and published massage therapist, Van T. Womack’s book, The Miraculous Power of Massage. I hope to be able to do even more in the future.

So if you have a dream, step out on faith, and pursue it. You never know where it will lead you. It can be a blessing to you, and to the world.

Dr. Maxine Thompson’s Upcoming
Appearances

June 15, 2011 Interview with Fran Lewis
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/rrradio/2010/10/20/book-discussion-with-fran-lewis

June 11, 2011
National Black Book Festival
Literary Agent Panelist Presenter
http://www.nationalblackbookfestival.com/breakthrough.htm

April 28th, 2011
Morning Side Library 4:00 p.m.
Inglewood, CA
Writer’s Workshop;
“How to Write a Best-selling novel”
http://alturl.com/ghocw

Red River Radio
Blogspot with Barbara
http://www.facebook.com/l/7f410VJ9ca0yE3eL3z6I640Kqmw;blogtalkradio.com/rrradio (or) Call-in Number: (646) 595-4478
3:00 p.m.

April 16, 2011
Black Writers on Tour
Workshop Conductor: How to Write a Bestselling Novel
11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

1. Tell us about your writing team. As a husband and wife, how did you begin writing together?

Actually, we teamed up as writers before we were married. Kathleen read Mike’s first novel and said, “All of your female characters should be murdered in the first chapter. You don’t really think women act like that, do you?” Since he wanted a third date, he let her rewrite them.

2. How does your background(s) as archaeologists inform your writing?

Archaeology is the heart of what we write. The science has been a part of our lives since long before we went to college–for example, Kathleen was on her first archaeological excavation at the age of ten–but certainly our academic backgrounds and our 35 years of archaeological field experience have become the cornerstones of our books. Our stories always begin and end with the archaeological record, and what it tells us about the rise and fall of prehistoric civilizations.

3 & 7. How do you re-create a world that is 600 years old? How much research do you complete for each book?

Writing fiction based upon archaeology and history is a balancing act. We always start with the archaeological record. It establishes the basic facts of what was happening in the 1400s. For example, we know from the burned villages and mutilated bodies, including those of children, that the warfare was brutal. Then we move to the historical record, and ask, what was the culture like at the point of contact with Europeans? By studying the Mourning Wars of the 1600s we get a clearer understanding of the practice of Iroquoian warfare, particularly how captives were taken and treated. Lastly, we study the oral history that has been passed down for centuries. There are literally hundreds of versions of the Peacemaker story.
For us, the hardest part of writing these books was selecting which details of Iroquoian oral history to use. We had to establish a kind of oral history baseline, which means that we looked for commonalities in the stories. Where many versions agreed, like on the subject of where Dekanawida was born, we used that detail. If stories disagreed dramatically, for example on what happened to him at the end of his life, we had real decisions to make. For the most part, we try to write about human beings, not divine beings, and that posed a problem here. Some versions of the Peacemaker story have Dekanawida establishing peace among the Iroquois, then traveling across the ocean to become the person known as Jesus. We chose not to use this element of oral history, not because we disbelieve, but rather because it seemed unlikely that this was part of the Peacemaker story prior to the arrival of missionaries in the 1600s. Making such decisions is, undoubtedly, the greatest challenge of writing prehistorical fiction.

4. Tell us about the Iroquois. What was their language like? What was their culture like?

Northern Iroquoian languages are very beautiful and sophisticated, containing nuances that can’t be duplicated in English. However, the origins of Northern Iroquoians is a hotly debated and very complex topic among archaeologists. Generally, we agree that the period from roughly A.D. 1000-1450 demonstrates fluid and shifting alliances, expanding trade networks, and changing settlement patterns. One thing is for certain: early Iroquoian cultures were remarkably adaptable and diverse.

At around A.D. 1000–the period we wrote about in People of the Masks–most Iroquoian peoples lived in small fishing villages or farming hamlets, primarily along rivers where they had good fertile soils and easy access to water. Toward the end of this period, they began moving away from watercourses and started building their villages atop easily defensible hilltops. Some were palisaded. For example, the Bates site in Chenango county, and the Sackett site near Canandaigua, New York, both of which date to the thirteenth century. The period we’re writing about in People of the Longhouse and The Dawn Country is the Late Iroquoian, which lasted from around A.D. 1350 to European contact. This is a critical period. At around A.D. 1400, the first evidence for individual tribes appears. Differences in pottery styles, burial customs, and types of houses, demonstrate divisions between Iroquoian groups. As well, small villages begin to amalgamate with larger ones, forming cohesive social groups, or, we suspect, nations.

A.D. 1400 is also the time when the Iroquois were building the most impressive longhouses, and many were elaborately fortified. At the Schoff site outside of Onondaga, New York, the people constructed a longhouse 400 feet long, twenty-two feet wide, and nearly as tall. The palisaded settlement may have housed 1,500 to 2,000 people, consisting of many different clans.

As people who’ve read our previous books know, often this type of aggregation is a telltale sign for archaeologists of interpersonal violence. Simply put, people crowd together for defensive purposes. This is also when cannibalism first appears in the Iroquoian archaeological record in the form of cut and cooked human bones.

Why did warfare break out? The fact that the climate had grown cooler and drier certainly contributed to the violence. We know that droughts were more frequent, growing seasons shorter, and food shortages probably more common. As well, larger villages deplete resources at a faster rate. Game populations, nut forests, firewood, and fertile soils would all have played out more quickly, which means they must have had to move their villages more often. Moving may have brought them into conflict with neighbors who needed the food resources just as desperately.
The warfare, we know, was violent.
At the Alhart site in the Oak Orchard Creek drainage in western New York, archaeologists found evidence of burned longhouses and food, and the dismembered remains of seventeen people–most of them male. Historically, it was common practice for women and children to either be killed on site, or taken captive and marched away while the male warriors were tortured and killed. At this site, the fragments of a child’s skull were found in one storage pit, and the skull of a woman in another storage pit. As well, fifteen male skulls were found in a storage pit on top of charred corn, and were probably placed there as severed heads, in-the-flesh. Some of them were burned. Two had suffered blows to the front of the head. We discuss many other such examples in the foreword to The Dawn Country.
As well, artifacts made from human bone are plentiful on Northern Iroquoian sites that date from the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth centuries. For example, two skulls were found at the Parsons site in Toronto. The Parsons site was an elaborately palisaded fifteenth century village. The two skulls, one male and one female, were found in a trash pit inside the inner palisade. Many other human bone artifacts are found in similar “refuse” situations. Human skull pendants or rattles are found across Ontario and New York at the Moatfield, Winking Bull, Uren, Pound, Crawford Lake, Jarret-Lahmer, Draper, Keffer, Lawson, Campbell, Clearview, Parsons, Beeton, Roebuck, Lite, Salem, and Glenbrook sites. Often the skulls, or skull fragments, have cut marks made by stone tools that are suggestive of scalping (as you already know from earlier paragraphs, it was not a French custom brought to the New World and adopted by the tribes. Scalping existed long before Europeans arrived). Such skulls were found at the Draper, Keffer and Lawson sites. Ground and polished fibulas and femurs (leg bones), as well as arm bones (radii) were used for beads, and scraping tools. Pierced mandibles (jaws), and finger and toe bones, were used as pendants. Ulnae (arm bones) became awls or daggers, and were also strung as beads. Why is it important to archaeologists that all of these artifacts were found in trash middens? Because Iroquoian peoples took very good care of their dead relatives. They had lengthy, and beautiful, burial rituals to make certain their loved ones reached the Land of the Dead. Since these human remains were not properly cared for, it suggests the bones may have come from less valuable members of society, like enemy captives.

Let’s take a few moments to discuss the Iroquoian perspective on captives. By the l400’s, as it was in historic times, warfare and raiding for captives was probably the most important method of gaining prestige in Northern Iroquoian societies. When a person died, the spiritual power of the clan was diminished, especially if that person had been a community leader. The places of missing family members literally remained vacant until they could be “replaced,” and their spiritual power–which was embodied in their name–transferred to another person.
Historical records tell us that during the 1600’s, the Iroquois dispatched war parties whose sole intent was to bring home captives to replace family members and restore the spiritual strength of the clans. These were called “mourning wars.” Clan matrons usually organized the war parties and ordered their warriors to bring them captives suitable for adoption to assuage their grief and restock the village. Once the clan had a suitable replacement, the captive underwent the Requickening Ceremony. In this ritual, the dead person’s soul was “raised up” and transferred to the captive, along with his or her name.
This may seem odd to modern readers, but keep the religious context in mind. The Iroquois believed that the souls of those who died violently could not find the Path of Souls in the sky that led to the Land of the Dead. They were excluded from the afterlife and doomed to spend eternity wandering the earth, seeking revenge. However, such souls could find rest if they were transferred—along with their name—to the body of another person. In a very concrete way, the relatives of the dead person were trying to save him.

The souls of men and women killed in battles that were not “raised up” were believed, according to some Seneca traditions, to move into trees. It was these trees with indwelling warrior spirits that the People cut to serve as palisade logs, thereby surrounding the village with Standing Warriors.
Iroquoian oral history speaks of this as a particularly brutal time, and clearly the archaeological record supports their stories.

But the violence was also the catalyst for one of the most important events in the history of the world. It led to the rise of a legendary hero, a Peacemaker, named Dekanawida, who established the Great Law of Peace and founded of the League of the Iroquois–a confederacy of five tribes: the Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, Cayuga and Seneca.

Without the League, the United States would not exist today, nor would our unique understanding of democracy. Concepts like one-person one-vote, or referendum and recall, were not European. They were Iroquoian.
And they would prove to be irresistible to the wave of colonists fleeing oppression in Europe.
In 1775, James Adair wrote a book called History of the American Indian, in which he described the Iroquoian system of government, by saying, “Their whole constitution breathes nothing but liberty…there is equality of condition, manners, and privileges…”
Indeed, the system of government espoused by the League was everything that Europeans monarchies were not. The Iroquois refused to put power in the hands of any single person, lest that power be abused. The League sought to maximize individual freedoms, and minimize governmental interference in people’s lives. The League taught that a system of government should preserve individual rights, while striving to insure the public welfare; it should reward initiative, champion tolerance, and establish inalienable human rights. They accepted as fact that men and women were equal and respected the diversity of peoples, their religions, economic and political ideals, their dreams.
On the eve of the American Revolution in 1776, English papers began circulating the following account, which was, incidentally, meant to be insulting: “The darling passion of the American is liberty, and that in its fullest extent; nor is it the original natives only to whom this passion is confined; our colonists sent thither seem to have imbibed the same principles.”
Indeed, they had.
Gifted writers like Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin would openly fan the flames of that “passion” for liberty, and set in motion a chain reaction that has yet to end. That passion would become a sweeping wildfire that would race around the globe and shape the very heart of what would, centuries later, become known as The Free World.
The Iroquois, quite simply, changed the course of history.

5. How did you come up with idea for book one, People of the Longhouse?

We’ve been studying Iroquoian cultures since 1978, so the idea has been percolating for a long time, but we couldn’t write this quartet of books about the founding of the League of the Iroquois until we’d set the stage first. It’s hard to understand any culture unless you grasp the people’s past. For example, no one could really understand America today if he or she didn’t know about the Revolutionary War, the Declaration of Independence, or the Civil War. That’s why we wrote the North America’s Forgotten Past series, to educate readers about North America’s magnificent prehistory. It’s taken us seventeen books to get to the point that we felt our readers would know enough to appreciate what happened with the Iroquois in the fifteenth century, and the impact they had on the future.

6. In Book 2, The Dawn Country, you continue the series. I understand this will be part of a quartet. What can we expect to see in Book 3?
Yes, the People of the Longhouse saga will have four books. The first duology chronicles the childhoods of the leading characters, and the second duology follows them as adults. In the third book, The Broken Land, readers will see Odion, Wrass, Zateri and Baji, as adults fighting for the life of their world. They’ll also see Odion, now Sky Messenger, be married and began the struggle for peace.

8. As a writing team, how do you divide up your books?
Because we have different expertises in archaeology and history, the best qualified person drafts out the bare bones of the plot and characters. Then we end up handing the book back and forth a dozen times, rewriting each other’s writing, adding more details, internal thoughts, and honing the action sequences, until we’re both happy with it. We wouldn’t recommend our technique for other couples, however. Writing is a very personal art, one where you infuse the words with your heart and soul. Allowing another person to tear your story apart and put it back together again requires absolute faith in your partner’s talent.

Thanks, Maxine!

Michael and Kathleen

W. Michael and Kathleen O’Neal Gear
Authors of
The People of the Longhouse, et. al

Maxine Thompson: Thank you for a fine interview. W. Michael and Kathleen O’Neal Gear

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