Racial Discrimination Archives

Excerpt from my eBook, Affirmations and Essays for Melanoid People by Dr. Maxine Thompson (2016)

“Whether the media forgets, we should never forget. Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Alva Braziel, Delrawn Smalls, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, and on the anniversary of Sandra Bland’s death, everything is the same. Let’s not forget Trayvon Martin, either. Do you recall any convictions for these murder victims? Do you expect to see any convictions for the more recent murder victims, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, which were captured on video and live streamed for the world to see? Or more recently, Charles Kinsey, a behavior therapist, who was shot by police Monday, 7-18-16, with his hands held up in the air?” (July 2016)

Juneteenth.com: “Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free.

Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863.”

Clarion Cry for Freedom!

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

Juneteenth Poem

June 17, 2017

(In Memory of Philando Castile)

Ever wondered how the ancestors survived
the boat ride from Africa to America?
Smells of everybody’s lives jumbled together
as they lay flanked side by side, in a cesspool
of blood, tears, and stool, dreaming the undreamable.

Deep in the bowels of a slave ship,
where many made their tomb,
a mother’s tears flowed from dried-eyed ducts,
for the suckling babe snatched from her breast,
while hating the enemy whose seed now grew in her womb.

Wait a minute, that’s my old poem, ‘The Middle Passage,’ 1992, regarding crack babies.
Scratch that.
Have things gotten any better in 2017?
Yesterday, I went to Leimert Park for a write-a-thon outing
and stumbled onto a Juneteenth celebration.
Revolutionary poet spouting words about “Police brutality”
Signs saying Stolen Legacy,
Liberation.
Libations.
Mass incarceration.
Sounds of Michael Jackson in the air
Michael Jackson impressionist moonwalking in golden gym shoes
Smells of alcohol mixed with medical marijuana wafting on the wind
Harambee’s Nag Champa Incense
Rivaling smells of smoked Barb-que
Rastafarian dancers singing and performing on the stage
Black men playing chess,

Our hair boasting Afros, Twists, Naturals,
Black to Blonde to Silver dreadlocks,
Dashikis Colors/green/red/black/yellow/brown.
Skin colors, sable browns to ochre to magnolia,
African Drummers
Down-home Blues bumping.
Thin alcoholic woman twerking.
Our melanin belies the years of razor-cut faces, eyes fox-fire red,
Reflecting years of pain,
Men popping fingers.
Here we are, part of the Diaspora,
I love my people.
We love, we care, we die…too soon,
Terrorism is right here on American soil
for Black blood which runs in the street
At the hands of those who are to protect and to serve.
Let us not forget how the killer of Philando Castile has gone free
On Juneteenth.
Where is the justice?
A Mother’s Tears…
Juneteenth…..Freedom.

Book Review: Having Her Say: A Compilation of Articles by and about Dr. Rosie—Time Keeper, Almanac and Score Keeper for Black America

by Dr. Rosie Milligan


Reviewed by Dr. Maxine Thompson


Having Her Say, Dr. Rosie Milligan’s 21st published book, is her much-awaited master piece. Part memoir, part business book, and part clarion call for Black people to wake up, Having Her Say will leave readers not only with something to think about, but with some action steps to take.


Dr. Milligan’s compilation of essays captures pivotal moments in Black History, such as witnessing the first Black President Barack Obama. Moreover, Dr. Milligan’s articles written since 1990, (which seemed controversial at the time,) prophesied the present condition of Black America. For instance, she predicted the plight of Black America and issued a warning that if Blacks did not change their attitude and economic direction, then history would repeat itself and Blacks would return to slavery, but in a more sophisticated form—having an illusion of freedom.


Given the current state of political anxiety and racial tension, these articles also provide a timely answer and direction as to where to go from here. These essays will help you look back to see where we have come from. Furthermore, they will give you a candid look at the historical moments that have impacted the lives of African Americans from the loss of Black businesses in Los Angeles, to the loss of social programs after the Watts riot in 1965, to the loss of civil rights through “the three strike” law. Dr. Milligan’s articles also chronicle the legal cases of Jena 6, and Christopher Dorner, and the LAPD saga. You feel like you’re getting a history lesson as you read the book, which is divided into sections with articles on Finances, Health, Sex, Family responsibilities to each other and Black Economic Empowerment. There are no-holds barred; she calls out ministers and politicians as to their accountability to “Black Folks.”


Find out what went into the making of the woman who boldly named herself, self-appointed “Mayor of South Central Los Angeles.” Follow Dr. Milligan’s journey from the South, where she describes herself as “an ex-cotton picker, a pea picker, a farmer, a hog slopper,” to South Los Angeles, where she has lived and worked in the community as an iconic leader, a publisher, an activist, and an entrepreneur of multiple businesses for the past 5 decades.


Described as a modern-day Harriet Tubman, Dr. Rosie Milligan has led the way to freedom for many Black businesses and writers through her mentoring and Black Writers on Tour conference, which, despite the economy, is celebrating its 21st year. She has been to Black writers what Barry Gordy’s Motown was to talented Black entertainers in the 1960s through 1980s, having published 350 authors through her company, the Professional Publishing House.


Learn within these pages, how like David going up against Goliath, Dr. Milligan has successfully fought the giants of oppression, racism and imperialism against great odds. Through this book, you will find the source of her strength. She has acted as a servant to God and her people throughout her adult life.


Having Her Say is filled with nuggets of wisdom, garnered from a life well-lived. This book is a conduit where readers will get an insight into how Dr. Milligan thinks and feels, as well as a national treasure, which will add to Dr. Milligan’s legacy by touching more lives.


This book should be in every Black person’s library.


Book is available in hardback and paper back at www.drrosie.com, Express Yourself Book Store, 1425 W. Manchester Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90047 323-750-3592


At Online Sellers.

Reviewed by:


Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

The Power of Voice II: An Artist in the Midst of War

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

“A time comes when silence is betrayal.’ Martin Luther King, Jr.”

“Those who commit the murders, write the reports.” Ida B. Wells

Here’s a Twitter post I tweeted on 9-24-16, which tells a story.

#TerrenceCrutcher #KeithLamontScott #TawonBoyd #RIP vs,#TheNewYorkBomber Still Alive #DylanRoof Terrorist Still Alive.

Malachi 4:1

Now a week later, 10-1-16, I retweeted filmmaker, activist, Tarique Nasheed’s tweet.

The LAPD just killed a Black man and wounded another, & now they immediately put on riot gear. But no one is rioting

Ida B. Wells was an activist and a journalist. According to Wikipedia: She was born into slavery in 1862, but as an adult, she documented lynching in the United States in the 1890s, showing that it was often used as a way to control or punish blacks who competed with whites, rather than being based on criminal acts by blacks, as was usually claimed by whites. Needless to say, she had a voice at a time when it was dangerous for a black person, a woman at that, to have a voice.

In that vein, I never realized how important my voice was until I lost mine after a thyroid surgery in 2008….

So I must speak out. Now we are living in an even more treacherous time, much of which is being documented through technology and social media. We can see the backlash that followed NFL player, Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the National Anthem in protest of the oppression of our people.

Whether the media forgets, we should never forget. Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Alva Braziel, Delrawn Smalls, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, and on the anniversary of Sandra Bland’s death, everything is the same. Let’s not forget Trayvon Martin, either. Do you recall any convictions for these murder victims? Do you expect to see any convictions for the more recent murder victims, Alton Sterling, Philandro Castile, which were captured on video and live streamed for the world to see? Charles Kinsey, a behavior therapist, who was shot by police Monday, 7-18-16, with his hands held up in the air.Twenty-three-year-old mother, Koryn Gaines, and the shooting of her 5-year-old son? Since then these police shootings/beating/murder: Terrence Cruthcher, Keith Lamont Scott, Tawon Boyd. And, most recently, here near my home, on 10-1-16, the officer-involved shooting of 18-year-old, Carnel Snell, Jr, in Los Angeles. Just before that there was the shooting of a mentally ill Black man, Reginald Thomas in Pasadena. Also the shooting of another mentally ill, homeless Black man, Joseph Mann, in Sacramento, and another Black man, Alfred Olango in El Cajon, California. Will there be any convictions?

This is beyond unjust. What should we do as writers? We write. My business philosophy, taken from my former job at the Los Angeles County Department of Children Services, (and my 23 years experience as a social worker) is, “If you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen.” For example, if a child was injured or killed in a foster home, or in its parent’s home, and the authorities couldn’t find any documentation in your case, indicating you had made all reasonable efforts to supervise and protect that child, you were in deep trouble.

Likewise, if you don’t write or speak out about what you are seeing happening here in the United States, you are just as involved in the complicity of these crimes we see around us.

Our job, as a writer, involves taking a stand. What is going on in America is wrong. Systemic racism is wrong. This involves all of its offshoots—mass incarceration of Blacks, poverty, redlining, racial profiling, police brutality, miseducation, and lack of reparations for our ancestors who provided the free labor which built the wealth of this country.

As writers, we need to document. The power of the pen still reigns.

Let us never forget. If you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen. I always see it on a deeper level. Without writing our passage down, “we,” as a people of African descent, didn’t happen.

About the Blogger: Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


July 18, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


July 18, 2016

Terrence R. McCrea
Author of

What Should We All Do After The Trayvon Martin Trial?


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 22, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


February 22, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 22, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


February 22, 2016

Christopher Emil Williams
Publisher, Author,
of Black Blue Bloods

Legacy of an African-American Plantation Owner


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


Hollywood Blues Fund Raiser Press Release

Check out both videos. Hollywood Blues Fund Raiser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBbHAAIZ1hI&feature=youtu.be

Hollywood Blues Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlpQS18oE7U

Immediate Release

Contact:
Dr. Maxine Thompson (323)242-9917
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com
http//www.maxinethompson.com
Hollywood Blues Trailer: http://youtu.be/NlpQS18oE7U

Former Social Worker and Former Foster Child Producing Film Based on an African American Family Raised in the Foster Care System

In the era of globalization, we still have people of color, in the other parts of the world, who think that African Americans don’t experience any disenfranchisement, racism, poverty, or discrimination as they do in their counterparts of the world. Particularly, since we have a Black President, people think African Americans live in a post-racial era.

Hollywood Blues, (screenplay written by Villalobos Odell Body, Executive Producer, based on novel, LA Blues by Maxine Thompson, Co-Producer) dispels that myth as it takes a look at dark, unexplored narratives here in Los Angeles. We’ve seen a male perspective in films, Training Day, Boyz n the Hood, and Menace to Society, but we’ve never seen the underbelly of LA from a Black female perspective.

Hollywood Blues is a tale of a woman, Zipporah Soldano, aka Z, who, as a result of her mother being imprisoned, grows up in foster care, then later becomes an LAPD officer. Some of the issues covered in the film will deal with domestic violence, (#whyIstayed), women in prison, The LA 1992 riots, the foster care system, LA Black/Hispanic gangs, police corruption, Mothers of Murdered Children, and stop the violence movements.

Although the LA Blues storyline took place in 2007-2008, these are reasons these issues still persist:

-Approximately 12%-13% of the American population is African-American, but they make up 40% of the almost 2.1 million male inmates in jail or prison (U.S. Department of Justice, 2009).[1] Census data for 2000 of the number and race of all individuals incarcerated in the United States revealed a wide racial disproportion of the incarcerated population in each state: the proportion of blacks in prison populations exceeded the proportion among state residents in twenty states; the percent of blacks incarcerated was five times greater than the resident population. For example, around 50% of Washington D.C.’s black young men are currently spending time behind bars. 1,000 people get arrested each month in our nation’s capital for dealing marijuana. But they are almost all young, black men. The impact to their future is significant. These men can lose college assistance, their driver’s license, their job, even custody of their children.

-Nationally, 400,540 children spent time in the foster care system during the 2011 Federal fiscal year (October 1st through September 30th). For race demographics, there are more children of color in the system compared to the overall U.S. population, but child abuse and neglect occur at about the same rate in all ethnic groups.

- http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/. February, 2012 Black females had an imprisonment rate nearly three times that of white females.

-Black and Mexican gangs continue to war. (May 2014) MEXICANS AND BLACKS KILLING EACH OTHER IN LOS ANGELES GANG WAR TIME: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MjSmgor5Dw

-The Trayvon Martin case, the Eric Garner and the Michael Brown case, which are just the more publicized cases showing ongoing police brutality.

Therefore, telling stories that reflect our different realities 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement are necessary. Hollywood Blues is a story of triumph and healing. We don’t just want to look at the problem, but to see how in adversity, there is a seed of opportunity. We want to inspire other foster children to be over comers like the main character, Z.

For radio interviews or print, contact Dr. Maxine Thompson at 323-342-9917 or email: maxtho@aol.com; or contact Villalobos Odell Body at 323-313-6068, or email: dale.body@gmail.com.

###

Dr. Maxine Thompson
maxtho@aol.com
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Immediate Release

Contact:
Dr. Maxine Thompson (323)242-9917
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com
http//www.maxinethompson.com
Hollywood Blues Trailer: http://youtu.be/NlpQS18oE7U

Former Social Worker and Former Foster Child Producing Film Based on an African American Family Raised in the Foster Care System

In the era of globalization, we still have people of color, in the other parts of the world, who think that African Americans don’t experience any disenfranchisement, racism, poverty, or discrimination as they do in their counterparts of the world. Particularly, since we have a Black President, people think African Americans live in a post-racial era.

Hollywood Blues, (screenplay written by Villalobos Odell Body, Executive Producer, based on novel, LA Blues by Maxine Thompson, Co-Producer) dispels that myth as it takes a look at dark, unexplored narratives here in Los Angeles. We’ve seen a male perspective in films, Training Day, Boyz n the Hood, and Menace to Society, but we’ve never seen the underbelly of LA from a Black female perspective.

Hollywood Blues is a tale of a woman, Zipporah Soldano, aka Z, who, as a result of her mother being imprisoned, grows up in foster care, then later becomes an LAPD officer. Some of the issues covered in the film will deal with domestic violence, (#whyIstayed), women in prison, The LA 1992 riots, the foster care system, LA Black/Hispanic gangs, police corruption, Mothers of Murdered Children, and stop the violence movements. .

Although the LA Blues storyline took place in 2007-2008, these are reasons these issues still persist:

-Approximately 12%-13% of the American population is African-American, but they make up 40% of the almost 2.1 million male inmates in jail or prison (U.S. Department of Justice, 2009).[1] Census data for 2000 of the number and race of all individuals incarcerated in the United States revealed a wide racial disproportion of the incarcerated population in each state: the proportion of blacks in prison populations exceeded the proportion among state residents in twenty states; the percent of blacks incarcerated was five times greater than the resident population. For example, around 50% of Washington D.C.’s black young men are currently spending time behind bars. 1,000 people get arrested each month in our nation’s capital for dealing marijuana. But they are almost all young, black men. The impact to their future is significant. These men can lose college assistance, their driver’s license, their job, even custody of their children.

-Nationally, 400,540 children spent time in the foster care system during the 2011 Federal fiscal year (October 1st through September 30th). For race demographics, there are more children of color in the system compared to the overall U.S. population, but child abuse and neglect occur at about the same rate in all ethnic groups.

- http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/. February, 2012 Black females had an imprisonment rate nearly three times that of white females.

-Black and Mexican gangs continue to war. (May 2014) MEXICANS AND BLACKS KILLING EACH OTHER IN LOS ANGELES GANG WAR TIME: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MjSmgor5Dw

-The Trayvon Martin case and the Michael Brown case, which are just the more publicized cases showing ongoing police brutality.

Therefore, telling stories that reflect our different realities 50 years after the Civil Rights Movement are necessary. Hollywood Blues is a story of triumph and healing. We don’t just want to look at the problem, but to see how in adversity, there is a seed of opportunity. We want to inspire other foster children to be over comers like the main character, Z.

For radio interviews or print, contact Dr. Maxine Thompson at 323-342-9917 or email: maxtho@aol.com; or contact Villalobos Odell Body at 323-313-6068, or email: dale.body@gmail.com.

###

Dr. Maxine Thompson
maxtho@aol.com
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Conscious Movie Making: The Journey for making independent film, Hollywood Blues
Dr. Maxine Thompson

http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

“When you want something, all the universe conspires to help you get it.”

Quote Taken from The Alchemist by Paul Coelho

Dale O’Body.
Producer/Screenwriter/ of


“Hollywood Blues”

Back in 1997, I remember saying, “I want to ‘do’ a movie from one of my books.” I had no idea what ‘doing a movie’ entailed. At the time, I was an overworked social worker, raising the last of three children, and at that time, I only had 2 self-published books. The Internet was new, I had no connections, and the whole idea seemed like an impossibility. But this dream kept haunting me.

Flashforward, 17 years. Last March 30, 2014 at nightfall, I stood hudded in a Watts alley, my hair standing on the back of my neck, aware of my age, (a senior), afraid I’d be shot in a drive-by each time I saw this souped-up car rushing through the same alley where we had tracks laid for the camera to shoot our opening close-up scene, and I can tell you something…. I’ve never felt more alive. I was finally living my dream. My novel, LA Blues, was coming to life before my eyes.

Everything was just falling in place. All the neighbors cooperated in the same manner Antoine Fuqua reported in the “Director’s Cut” while shooting the iconic film, “Training Day,” with which the neighbors from the infamous “Jungle” had cooperated.

I felt like I was watching a miracle happen. I never felt so much love for “my people.” Everyone recognized the sound of the main character’s bark, “LAPD”, when banging on the door to report the murder of a woman. Everyone recognized this was one of “our stories.”

Using a creative approach to shooting our trailer, we had pulled it all together. I guess it’s true. Where there’ s a will, there’s a way.

“It was for such a time as this,” I kept thinking of the Bible scripture. Esther 4:14
“… And who knows whether you have not come to the kingdom for such a time as this?” (ESV)

Now all the years I had worked as a social worker, first 7 years in the inner city of Detroit, then followed by 16 years in Los Angeles, made sense. In “Hollywood Blues,” I was telling one of my client’s story, even if it was a fictional amalgamation of one of the foster children I probably worked with. I feel this story has an important message, both tied in with the high rate of African American children in foster care, and the number of young African American men who are murdered, rather through Police violence or Black–on-Black or Brown-on-Black Crime.

Unknowingly, the stars were in alignment. I met my Executive producer, Villalobos Odell Body, at Black Writers on Tour in 2012. He is the host and producer of the show WolfTix Radio on EINRadio (www.exclusiveinfo.net) with over 50,000 monthly visitors. He took my book and wrote the screenplay within two months. Later, I found out he had been a former foster child so he could relate to the story. He is one of the former children who came up in the system and who beat the odds. He saw my vision to help speak for the voiceless—the many African American children in the foster care system and those who grew up in it. He also knows a lot of up and coming rappers as he shoots videos, does documentaries, and writes screenplays. Thus, we became co-producers for “Hollywood Blues” based on my novel, LA Blues.

I met the lead actress/model, Jennifer Renee the summer of 2012 at the Emerge Christian Film Conference in Los Angeles. She even looks like my main character, Zipporah Soldano aka Z. She’s also from my hometown Detroit.

During this journey, I loved watching the play of light and darkness in the filming and editing process. I saw the light and darkness as symbolic of the American Dream and its pitfalls. In addition, I enjoyed writing the voice over, since I knew the voice of the main character, Z.

So now we’re in the fundraising phase.

I call this “conscious filmmaking,” because we are doing this film with a purpose. From the storyline, we would like to give hope to show that urban youth can beat the odds such as the main character, Z, does. Besides entertaining and informing our audience, one of our goals is to educate and empower young men and women in how to make it in production. Our target audience will be urban youth, and those raised in foster care. Later training them in film production will help with juvenile delinquency diversion.

We will also be helping authors shoot movie trailers of their books or do audios of their books. If you would like more information, please contact me at maxtho@aol.com or contact Dale at dale.body@gmail.com.

Hollywood Blues Trailer: Calling All Angels

Hollywood Blues Trailer: http://youtu.be/NlpQS18oE7U

http://hollywoodbluesfilm.com
Hollywood_Blues_EPak_d2

We are looking for sponsors and partners that want to reach the strong women’s market through the independent film, Hollywood Blues, based on the novel, LA Blues, by Maxine Thompson, which has been sold on Black Expressions Book Club in hard back, and internationally for almost 2 years. The screenplay was written by Executive Producer, Villalobos Odell Body.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 25, 2014


Maxine Thompson


Dr. Maxine’s Show provides sponsorship for entrepreneurs and the literary community.
Dr. Maxine Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses
host on ArtistFirst

Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


August 25, 2014


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 25, 2014

Email dj@artistfirst.com for questions for the author


August 25, 2014

Minister Bryant Keith Williams, Sr.
Author of



The Ugly Side of America:
A Society that Still Devalues Black Men


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

Divas of Literature

Queens Book Fair



If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com or maxtho@sbcglobal.net

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


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