Racism Archives

Excerpt from my eBook, Affirmations and Essays for Melanoid People by Dr. Maxine Thompson (2016)

“Whether the media forgets, we should never forget. Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Alva Braziel, Delrawn Smalls, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, and on the anniversary of Sandra Bland’s death, everything is the same. Let’s not forget Trayvon Martin, either. Do you recall any convictions for these murder victims? Do you expect to see any convictions for the more recent murder victims, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, which were captured on video and live streamed for the world to see? Or more recently, Charles Kinsey, a behavior therapist, who was shot by police Monday, 7-18-16, with his hands held up in the air?” (July 2016)

Juneteenth.com: “Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free.

Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863.”

Clarion Cry for Freedom!

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

Juneteenth Poem

June 17, 2017

(In Memory of Philando Castile)

Ever wondered how the ancestors survived
the boat ride from Africa to America?
Smells of everybody’s lives jumbled together
as they lay flanked side by side, in a cesspool
of blood, tears, and stool, dreaming the undreamable.

Deep in the bowels of a slave ship,
where many made their tomb,
a mother’s tears flowed from dried-eyed ducts,
for the suckling babe snatched from her breast,
while hating the enemy whose seed now grew in her womb.

Wait a minute, that’s my old poem, ‘The Middle Passage,’ 1992, regarding crack babies.
Scratch that.
Have things gotten any better in 2017?
Yesterday, I went to Leimert Park for a write-a-thon outing
and stumbled onto a Juneteenth celebration.
Revolutionary poet spouting words about “Police brutality”
Signs saying Stolen Legacy,
Liberation.
Libations.
Mass incarceration.
Sounds of Michael Jackson in the air
Michael Jackson impressionist moonwalking in golden gym shoes
Smells of alcohol mixed with medical marijuana wafting on the wind
Harambee’s Nag Champa Incense
Rivaling smells of smoked Barb-que
Rastafarian dancers singing and performing on the stage
Black men playing chess,

Our hair boasting Afros, Twists, Naturals,
Black to Blonde to Silver dreadlocks,
Dashikis Colors/green/red/black/yellow/brown.
Skin colors, sable browns to ochre to magnolia,
African Drummers
Down-home Blues bumping.
Thin alcoholic woman twerking.
Our melanin belies the years of razor-cut faces, eyes fox-fire red,
Reflecting years of pain,
Men popping fingers.
Here we are, part of the Diaspora,
I love my people.
We love, we care, we die…too soon,
Terrorism is right here on American soil
for Black blood which runs in the street
At the hands of those who are to protect and to serve.
Let us not forget how the killer of Philando Castile has gone free
On Juneteenth.
Where is the justice?
A Mother’s Tears…
Juneteenth…..Freedom.

Book Review: Having Her Say: A Compilation of Articles by and about Dr. Rosie—Time Keeper, Almanac and Score Keeper for Black America

by Dr. Rosie Milligan


Reviewed by Dr. Maxine Thompson


Having Her Say, Dr. Rosie Milligan’s 21st published book, is her much-awaited master piece. Part memoir, part business book, and part clarion call for Black people to wake up, Having Her Say will leave readers not only with something to think about, but with some action steps to take.


Dr. Milligan’s compilation of essays captures pivotal moments in Black History, such as witnessing the first Black President Barack Obama. Moreover, Dr. Milligan’s articles written since 1990, (which seemed controversial at the time,) prophesied the present condition of Black America. For instance, she predicted the plight of Black America and issued a warning that if Blacks did not change their attitude and economic direction, then history would repeat itself and Blacks would return to slavery, but in a more sophisticated form—having an illusion of freedom.


Given the current state of political anxiety and racial tension, these articles also provide a timely answer and direction as to where to go from here. These essays will help you look back to see where we have come from. Furthermore, they will give you a candid look at the historical moments that have impacted the lives of African Americans from the loss of Black businesses in Los Angeles, to the loss of social programs after the Watts riot in 1965, to the loss of civil rights through “the three strike” law. Dr. Milligan’s articles also chronicle the legal cases of Jena 6, and Christopher Dorner, and the LAPD saga. You feel like you’re getting a history lesson as you read the book, which is divided into sections with articles on Finances, Health, Sex, Family responsibilities to each other and Black Economic Empowerment. There are no-holds barred; she calls out ministers and politicians as to their accountability to “Black Folks.”


Find out what went into the making of the woman who boldly named herself, self-appointed “Mayor of South Central Los Angeles.” Follow Dr. Milligan’s journey from the South, where she describes herself as “an ex-cotton picker, a pea picker, a farmer, a hog slopper,” to South Los Angeles, where she has lived and worked in the community as an iconic leader, a publisher, an activist, and an entrepreneur of multiple businesses for the past 5 decades.


Described as a modern-day Harriet Tubman, Dr. Rosie Milligan has led the way to freedom for many Black businesses and writers through her mentoring and Black Writers on Tour conference, which, despite the economy, is celebrating its 21st year. She has been to Black writers what Barry Gordy’s Motown was to talented Black entertainers in the 1960s through 1980s, having published 350 authors through her company, the Professional Publishing House.


Learn within these pages, how like David going up against Goliath, Dr. Milligan has successfully fought the giants of oppression, racism and imperialism against great odds. Through this book, you will find the source of her strength. She has acted as a servant to God and her people throughout her adult life.


Having Her Say is filled with nuggets of wisdom, garnered from a life well-lived. This book is a conduit where readers will get an insight into how Dr. Milligan thinks and feels, as well as a national treasure, which will add to Dr. Milligan’s legacy by touching more lives.


This book should be in every Black person’s library.


Book is available in hardback and paper back at www.drrosie.com, Express Yourself Book Store, 1425 W. Manchester Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90047 323-750-3592


At Online Sellers.

Reviewed by:


Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Using Research to Find Topics for Your Stories


Through research you can find topics, subjects and ‘seeds’ for stories. Pick five different topics that interest you, and research them on the Internet, or through your local library. These topics can be virtually anything, as long as they interest you, and the information is available. Write brief summaries of specific pieces of information that you come across—seeds that could become the basis for future stories. After the summary, list things you’ve learned or thoughts that could form the basis of future stories.

Examples:

Through my research, I discovered old-fashioned practices for abortions, birth control and other home remedies during and after slavery. The deeper level of meaning was that life was almost so unbearable for Black women at that point in history that some women would rather abort using primitive methods and risk her life than bring another child into the world. There were even plantations where it appeared the women were barren, and that was not the case. They even knew how to use herbs to abort. I used the idea of old-fashioned, illegal abortion in The Ebony Tree. In my novel, Hostage of Lies, the blacksmith who was not branded because of his ability to work with horses, later exemplified a black man whose soul could not be branded, chained, or enslaved.

Topics I am currently researching: The North Carolina Sea Islands where the culture is similar to after slavery. The slave castles on the West Coast of Africa. Children who are reared in foster care, and its after effects. (This was the seed for my novels, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, LA Blues 3.) The coming of a military state or concentration camps in the United States.

Sometimes you can combine different story ideas for an interesting story.


Where Can You Begin?

Know your idea. Start with a “What if” premise. For instance, what if there was a secret conspiracy to put African Americans in concentration camps? (Author, John A. Williams, The Man Who Cried I am.)

You might bring a moment in history alive through weaving fact, poetic license and fancy. Use old newspapers to find out how people viewed the world in a different era. You can find these on microfiche at the library. Look for subjects of your interest such as animals such as ferrets, computer dating, the criminal justice system, the mass incarceration of Black men, mass shootings, ISIS, terrorists, serial killers, (particularly if you’re a mystery writer.) Go on field trips in your local area to add local color to your book. Go to travel agencies to get information for different locales your book, if you can’t visit a location. Or you can use mind mapping to use a non-linear approach to outlining your book’s significant details.

For mind mapping for subject ideas, you can find software at www.mindjet.com.

Therefore, there is never a shortage of ideas for your stories. When you hit a brick wall in your writing, you might just need to do more research.

Sign up for the free newsletter at http://www.maxinethompson.com or http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com.

About the Blogger: Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, blogger, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. As an editor, she has edited/ghostwritten numerous best-selling books (Including New York Times Best Selling books), for African Americans, including many books for men and women who are incarcerated in the prison system. In a down economy, as a literary agent, she has negotiated over 100 book deals for African Americans. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), a contributor to bestselling anthologies, Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club best-seller, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, Novellas, The Katrina Blues, and Capri’s Second Chance, contributor to anthology,Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a small Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012. LA Blues 3 was published in August 2013.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


July 18, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


July 18, 2016

Terrence R. McCrea
Author of

What Should We All Do After The Trayvon Martin Trial?


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


THE REAL KILLERS OF THE FIVE COPS IN DALLAS TEXAS

BY AN ELDER, DR. ROSIE MILLIGAN

The persons responsible for the loss of lives of the five policemen in Dallas, Texas are as follows: Those who continue to perpetuate institutionalized racism throughout America—in its schools, universities, legal and criminal justice system. This also includes every law enforcement officer—black, white and others—who stood by and said nothing, and did nothing, while white officers beat or killed black men unjustly. The racist defense and prosecuting attorney, every juror who stood up for the policemen who were guilty in taking the lives of black men—yes, you are the guilty ones. And if you have any conscience today, you should be haunted by the trigger pulled by the gunman on that dreadful evening July 7, 2016.

I have lived seventy years in America, and I am a third generation removed from slavery. I experience the past, the present and the future all in one. I have a glimpse of the future, which is based on the facts that the more things change, the more they stay the same. The black man/woman is just as enslaved today legally as in the past. The criminal justice system upholds the law when it comes to disregarding the black person as a human being—which appears to be legal.

My question to all non-blacks is: what if your men were being brutally and unjustly murdered at the rate black men are being murdered, how would you feel and what would you do? When I saw those cops on top of a black man—who was in a helpless position, then shot, I had a flashback. Pain gripped my abdomen. I thought about when I was young, living in Mississippi when white men would roll up on horses to a black person’s house and call for a father or a father’s son to come out the house so they could either beat him in the presence of his family, or kill him. Nothing was done to the killer then, and nothing is done, in most cases, now. After witnessing the black man, Alton Sterling, who was killed just recently, I cried, I cried and I cried.

We must all stand up, and speak up when injustice is done. Here is a good quote I read online. “The only thing necessary for the Triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” Remember, the crop we plant today, our children will be the reapers of it tomorrow. Is it the masses who want a race war, or is it just a few evil ones who are trying to ignite a race war? You may not witness a race war in your time, however, if things do not change, there will be one. Is this what you want your children to inherit from your wrong doings? Think. If you have any doubt about what I am saying to you, you had better ask your young people how they feel about what’s going on. You will be quite surprised.

Here is another quote I read online:

“Young whites do not ascribe to the notion ‘We want our country back.’ It’s the old evil power thirsty white folks. Young whites know that you evil ones have lied to them. Their association with blacks in school, in sports, etc., they know truth. And they want to be like blacks, they want to sing like us, dance like us, dress like us, preach and praise like us—don’t you get it? They want to live in peace as God would have it to be—can’t you see how many of them are marching in the Black Life Matters Movement? Does that tell you something?”

America, you have pushed blacks against the wall, and they have two choices: give in to the ills of society, or stand up and fight for themselves and for their children. You have created a monster in your own back yard. Many black men are in prison unjustly. They pled guilty to a felony because they did not have the money to hire an attorney to represent them. Upon their release, due to a felony, they cannot obtain federal/state assistance such as: low-income housing, food stamps, federal grants for education and cannot be caught in the presence of another felon—Oh, America, America the beautiful, what are you doing to black people? Where there is no justice, there will be no peace. Young blacks will not continue to take, and to put up with, the injustice and do nothing; they have been placed in a positon whereby they don’t have much to lose. The new culture, the new crop, would rather go down fighting than to stand still, do nothing and be killed.

Let me leave you with these words of wisdom: A house divided, cannot stand. An enemy inside of a house can destroy you quicker and faster than the enemy on the outside. America, we have enemies all around the world. If we are to survive, we must come together as one race. We can do better, and we must do better, starting today and henceforth.

Dr. Rosie Milligan, minister, author, senior estate planner, credit consultant, talk show host of Express Yourself Hour, owner of Professional Business Consulting Service, 1425 W. Manchester Ave. Ste. B, Los Angeles, CA 90047, 323-750-3592, drrosie@aol.com, www.Drrosie.com




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 22, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


February 22, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 22, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


February 22, 2016

Christopher Emil Williams
Publisher, Author,
of Black Blue Bloods

Legacy of an African-American Plantation Owner


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, November 9, 2015


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


November 9, 2015


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, November 9, 2015

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


November 9, 2015

Dr. Joseph F. Bentivegna, M.D.
Author of

The Neglected and Abused: A Physician’s Year in Haiti


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


THE MALIGNANT HATE CANCER TOOK NINE LIVES

Dr. Rosie Milligan, an elder

Deep-rooted hatred is a deadly poison. It’s hard for me to conceive how such deep hatred could fill the heart of a person who has only experienced twenty-one years of living. After the September 11 (9/11) tragedy, a little child asked the question, “Why do they hate us so much?” I asked myself the question, “Why do some white people hate black folks so much?”

Black people are America’s best friend. We are more loyal than any race. With our sweat, tears and blood, we built this country, and—even though we never got the forty acres and a mule as promised—we continued to love white folks. We nursed their babies from our breast milk. We took care of their children while leaving our little children at home to fend for themselves. We birthed babies from seeds their men implanted in our wombs, with no consideration given to that offspring. Black men accepted the white man’s seed and provided for the child, without complaint; he went along to get along.

Blacks were beaten and killed for attempting to learn how to read. The welfare system refused to assist a needy black family when the father was in the house, therefore forcing the black man to leave home in order for his wife and children to get a little help to survive. (Revisit the movie Claudine). Black men had to leave town, leaving their wives and children behind for merely talking back to a white man or for an accusation of looking at a white woman. Remember Emmitt Till, the young teen murdered in Mississippi in 1955. Many black men escaped the South because they feared for their lives. Some of them never got enough money to return for their families and they started new families, therefore causing fatherless children. Maybe Tulsa, Oklahoma needs to be revisited when black folks had an enclaved community with thriving businesses that was destroyed by a white mob.

Maybe America needs a review of black history, where black families, children, mothers and fathers, wives and husbands were separated and sold as slaves to new masters. Let’s teach on how white men have continued to perpetuate wealth from inventions they stole from blacks—inventions that changed lives for all Americans for the betterment. The list is too long to include in this article—Google “black inventions.” Let’s fast forward to the “NEW SLAVE SHIP” that does not sail—the prison industrial complex that separates black men and women from their children and families.

My point is simple. It is time that all races learn the history and conditions forced upon blacks in America. If the shooter had known the history of how America has treated the black race as a whole, I believe his hatred for the black race would not have been as such. Black folks’ condition is a by-product of the inhumane treatment and injustice served him by the establishment.

We cannot undo what has happened, however, we can all work hard on doing our part to ensure that this type of tragedy will never happen again based on race. As adults and parents, we must teach love in our homes and not leave that responsibility to our children to learn on their own. The love blacks have for white folks were demonstrated via the response that the victims’ families shared nationally toward the shooter when they expressed forgiveness.

I pray we all learn a great lesson concerning sharing our views with our children. They know how their friends feel about other races, they hear their thoughts, they see and hear the media’s perspective, but they also, more than anything, need to hear from us—their parents and elders. We must do a better job in communicating about social issues and we cannot omit discussing race in our homes, our churches and schools. I want to share much more, but I realize this is an article and not a book. I know what has happened is real; I still want to see it as just a dream/nightmare or something like that. This should not happen in America in 2015.

Dr. Rosie Milligan, minister, author, senior estate planner/credit consultants, talk show host of Express Yourself Hour, and owner of Professional Business Consultant and LA Credit Consultants, 1425 W. Manchester Ave., Ste. B, Los Angeles, CA 90047, 323-750-3592, email:drrosie@aol.com.

  
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