Reinvention Archives





Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows

This Week’s Guest – Monday, August 28, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


August 28, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Dr. Maxine Thompson will be the Guest – Monday, August 28, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the host or Dr. Maxine Thompson


August 28, 2017


August 28, 2017


D. Watkins
Author of

The Cook Up
A Crack Rock Memoir



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EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

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release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html

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Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Using Research to Find Topics for Your Stories


Through research you can find topics, subjects and ‘seeds’ for stories. Pick five different topics that interest you, and research them on the Internet, or through your local library. These topics can be virtually anything, as long as they interest you, and the information is available. Write brief summaries of specific pieces of information that you come across—seeds that could become the basis for future stories. After the summary, list things you’ve learned or thoughts that could form the basis of future stories.

Examples:

Through my research, I discovered old-fashioned practices for abortions, birth control and other home remedies during and after slavery. The deeper level of meaning was that life was almost so unbearable for Black women at that point in history that some women would rather abort using primitive methods and risk her life than bring another child into the world. There were even plantations where it appeared the women were barren, and that was not the case. They even knew how to use herbs to abort. I used the idea of old-fashioned, illegal abortion in The Ebony Tree. In my novel, Hostage of Lies, the blacksmith who was not branded because of his ability to work with horses, later exemplified a black man whose soul could not be branded, chained, or enslaved.

Topics I am currently researching: The North Carolina Sea Islands where the culture is similar to after slavery. The slave castles on the West Coast of Africa. Children who are reared in foster care, and its after effects. (This was the seed for my novels, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, LA Blues 3.) The coming of a military state or concentration camps in the United States.

Sometimes you can combine different story ideas for an interesting story.


Where Can You Begin?

Know your idea. Start with a “What if” premise. For instance, what if there was a secret conspiracy to put African Americans in concentration camps? (Author, John A. Williams, The Man Who Cried I am.)

You might bring a moment in history alive through weaving fact, poetic license and fancy. Use old newspapers to find out how people viewed the world in a different era. You can find these on microfiche at the library. Look for subjects of your interest such as animals such as ferrets, computer dating, the criminal justice system, the mass incarceration of Black men, mass shootings, ISIS, terrorists, serial killers, (particularly if you’re a mystery writer.) Go on field trips in your local area to add local color to your book. Go to travel agencies to get information for different locales your book, if you can’t visit a location. Or you can use mind mapping to use a non-linear approach to outlining your book’s significant details.

For mind mapping for subject ideas, you can find software at www.mindjet.com.

Therefore, there is never a shortage of ideas for your stories. When you hit a brick wall in your writing, you might just need to do more research.

Sign up for the free newsletter at http://www.maxinethompson.com or http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com.

About the Blogger: Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, blogger, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. As an editor, she has edited/ghostwritten numerous best-selling books (Including New York Times Best Selling books), for African Americans, including many books for men and women who are incarcerated in the prison system. In a down economy, as a literary agent, she has negotiated over 100 book deals for African Americans. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), a contributor to bestselling anthologies, Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club best-seller, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, Novellas, The Katrina Blues, and Capri’s Second Chance, contributor to anthology,Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a small Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012. LA Blues 3 was published in August 2013.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, April 18, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


April 18, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, April 18, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


April 18, 2016

Shellie Blum
Author of

Waterski Girl Wonder:
A Journey of Perseverance


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


“Sister Day”

Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxnethompsonbooks.com

In Honor of Women’s month, I am devoting this blog to “Sister Day.”

As working women, we tend to wear ourselves out, burning the candle on both ends. We work all day. Come home and continue the second shift, dealing with our families. Eventually, something breaks down, if you don’t take care of yourself.

As many of you know, I worked for 23 years as a social worker in a high stress environment, first in the inner city of Detroit, then in the inner city (hood) of Los Angeles. I often became burnt out. Due to health problems and other reasons, I left the job in 1997. In 1998, I started Maxine Thompson’s Literary Services and began editing for other writers.

Unfortunately, I took the same bad habits of over work into this new venture. Even being self-employed as an editor, ghostwriter, writer and literary agent, I found the same burnout and crashing from overwork. It really boiled down to not having balance.

Things changed when my late, older sister, Nancy, moved back to Los Angeles in 2002. She was always a free spirit and knew how to enjoy life. Over the next year, we established what we called “Sister Day.” On “Sister Day,” we relaxed and connected. She would take down my braids, (that’s before I started my dread locks). I’d fry shrimps, and she’d make the salad and soup. We would watch old movies on videos and take the day off. I noticed after “Sister Day,” I would get just as much work done, if not more.

This ritual continued from 2002, to the first of January of 2008. That particular afternoon, I noticed Nancy was short of breath and couldn’t stand for long as she tried to chop up the vegetables. A dark cloud came over me. I called my younger sister, Sonya, who later told me, “I knew something was wrong, when you started crying. We know you’re strong.” She and my sister’s daughter, Denise, flew to California right away. Within a whirlwind 6 weeks, my sister was diagnosed with a blood clot in her lung, then was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer. Subsequently, we set up a hospital bed in her apartment, started hospice with visiting nurses and social workers, but she passed anyhow on February 11, 2008. At the time, I was devastated and grief stricken. I wrote my novel, LA Blues, (2011) to examine how grief shapes and turns our life upside down.

But with time, I healed. Now, I look back with fond memories and gratitude to Nancy and “Sister Day.” It served several purposes. One, it helped cement our bond as adults who truly enjoyed one another’s company. We already had shared memories from our childhood, which I captured in my first novel, The Ebony Tree.

Over those 6 years, Nancy had traveled with me to conferences all over the United States, and had even flown to China on a business trip. But, on a deeper level, “Sister Day” also helped to replenish and restore our souls.

From this I learned something. Women need sisterhood, whether it’s church family, a book club, a writers group, close friends, or biological sisters. These are just some tips I learned that have sustained me as a working freelance writer/novelist/author/ghostwriter/editor/literary agent.

Take down time from work or you will wind up flat on your back physically or emotionally.

Have a spiritual relationship with God.

Connect with other people. (For women, this is where “Sister Day” can be particularly healing.)

Find ways to protect yourself.

Meditate.

Exercise.

Breathe.

Do morning pages. (Read Julia Cameron’s The Artist Way.)

Do your gratitude list.

Restore your soul.

So let’s establish a sister day. Maybe even have a National Sister Day. It can be restorative. It can regenerate your creativity. It can build memories and close bonds. Just having good friends (or sisters) can make life worth living.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, September 21, 2015


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


September 21, 2015


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, September 21, 2015

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


September 21, 2015

Allan McDougall
Author of

Breaking Through
Discovering the Riches Within


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


http://monicacartertagore.com/creativity-and-business/5-life-laws-for-creatives-artists-and-others-where-talent-is-the-gift/

Talent is never the determining factor for success in the career of a creative — an artist, author, designer, or anyone else whose ability and imagination play into the development of work.

That’s a lesson some creatives never quite get.

And it’s very sad.

It’s sad because they spend their lives struggling to be acknowledged for their talent, and wondering why they’ve not had their big break, why the stars haven’t aligned, why someone hasn’t given them the shot they feel their talent must surely deserve.

Don’t get me wrong: Talent helps. It’s important. You’ve got to start with some basic ability. But talent is simply not enough to turn your aspiration into a career. For that, you need a whole lot more.

I saw an episode of America’s Got Talent a few weeks back in which a singer was auditioning for his big break. In the profile they did of him, they shared that he had already landed a recording deal some years back and had even received Grammy nominations (or did he actually win?). Yet, there he was, along with the others who had never seen any deals, some of whom had never performed for an audience beyond their families. How did he get to that point, that he was auditioning along with amateurs, when he was talented and had already attained some success? I actually liked his voice and was rooting for him. Unfortunately, he didn’t make the cut.

I don’t know the answer to the question for him, but as someone who helps individuals market businesses based on their gifts, I know that many creative people have talent but never quite turn it into much more.

Some try. But, lacking the skills to turn that talent into a livelihood, they have packed it away and are working soul-crushing jobs, leading lackluster lives, unhappy and unfulfilled. As a creative myself, I decided very early on that I would take control of my talent and my life and not leave my happiness and my aspirations up to others’ whims. That, in a single thought, is what is necessary when you want to make a living around your talent.

In my case, I chose to go the indie route, as a way to simply get going and not wait around for someone else. I self-published my first two books, and, based on going my own way, I landed a book deal. Actually, I landed two deals, but canceled the first, as it turned out not to be what I wanted, once I realized how little say I would actually have in the creative choices related to my book. I went on to land on a couple of best seller lists, travel the country selling books to anyone I could, and doing all the other things one does when one is building a career as a creative. I didn’t limit my aspirations to simply selling my books; I learned how to package my abilities and expertise into offerings clients would pay for. And that’s how my business grew.

You see, our talent is our gift. We can’t waste it waiting around for others, or let it languish when we finally give up hope that others will choose us. No, life blessed us with that talent to actually do something with it. But the talent was just a starting point.

As a life strategist and business consultant who helps people use their gifts — talent, skill, expertise, message, or big idea — in business, I have identified several life laws for the creative. These life laws can help you navigate your own creative career and create your own success, so you’re not waiting around for someone else’s blessing.

Here they are:

Life Law #1 for the Creative: Nobody is coming to give you a big break.

Strategy: Create your own big break.

We’ve all heard stories of people who were just minding their own business in their ordinary lives, not even pursuing work related to their talent, when somehow — miraculously — some big executive or big player discovered them. They were whisked away to success, almost without lifting a finger.

Yeah, that won’t happen for you.

Don’t leave your life and work up to somebody else. Choose to own your life and the aspirations for what you’ll do with your talent. Rather than look longingly and wistfully for a big break bestowed on you by someone else, make it your business to create your own break. Choose to take daily and consistent action to build the career you dream of; when you attain success and look back, you’ll see your big break, not necessarily as one magical moment orchestrated by someone else, but as the moment you chose to take control and make it happen. And by taking control through daily and consistent action, you will attract bigger and bigger opportunities.

You’ll have to be disciplined and work sometimes even when you don’t want to, but that’s what’s necessary when you’re creating your own big break.

Life Law #2 for the Creative: Art and money are not an either/or.

Strategy: Become a creative entrepreneur and work on ways to turn your talent into a marketable offering others will pay you to deliver.

The poverty mentality of some creatives truly disturbs me. It disturbs me because it automatically casts the talent the creative has been blessed to have, into a position of not being a part of the equation for earning that creative a living. When we creatives stand stubbornly on an idea that we work just for the art and not for money, we put ourselves in the compromised position of seeing our work as either giving us joy or earning us money. If you need money (and every person does) and refuse to allow your gift to be a part of your money-making equation, that is poverty thinking. Your gift can and should do both — be something used for art and be something used to earn money. Why else do you think you have the talent?

You must be an entrepreneur, if you want to be a working artist. It’s just that simple. So think of yourself, not just as someone who creates art, but as someone who builds a business around that art.

Choose to embrace the entrepreneurial mindset and marry your talent with business strategies, principles, and practices. You can enjoy your talent while creating something others will pay for. What are the needs in the marketplace? In what ways can your talent be used to help others? How creative can you be in turning your talent into something others are absolutely happy to hand over money to receive?

Life Law #3 for the Creative: Your audience wants to find you.

Strategy: Build a website and online presence that attracts those who will “get” you.

You don’t have to try to blend in and be like everyone else. And you shouldn’t even try to appeal to everyone, because you’ll dilute your brand and end up so general and generic that you risk appealing to no one. But you need to appeal to the right ones — those who get you and who are interested in (and some of whom ultimately buy) what you produce.

If you want to appeal to such an audience, you’ve got to create the infrastructure to attract that audience. That means building a brand that evokes a certain emotion, a certain feeling. Be sure that brand is reflected in your career assets such as your website, blog, social media profiles, one-sheets or bios, posters, etc. Do you have certain basics on your site such as samples or a portfolio? Do you have an easy and effective way to convert website visitors into people you can build a relationship with on an ongoing basis? If not, then you’ll have a site that may attract visitors, but then you’ll never hear from them again and so won’t be able to market to them in the future — won’t be able to tell them about the latest project you’ve produced, the events you’ll be hosting or are featured at, etc. Make it your top priority to create an online presence to attract your audience. There are several layers to this approach, and you need to take this seriously because converting casual visitors into fans and people who want to hear from you is pretty important to your long-term success.

Life Law #4 for the Creative: You have to make it great and let it go.

Strategy: Go for excellence, not perfection, and build a body of work.

Too often, we are under the misguided notion that we should keep working on our projects and working on our projects, in some elusive hunt for perfection. While it sounds good to say you are a perfectionist and will only release work that is perfect, that is actually a trap. It’s a trap to keep you stuck in being unproductive. You see, by nature, a creative project can be changed and changed and changed. Sometimes, more changes don’t make it better — not even perfect — but merely different. Sometimes, too many changes can actually destroy the work.

Besides, being on a quest for “perfection” can actually be a mask for procrastination. You claim that you are busily working in your studio, so you can produce your next perfect masterpiece, but somehow the work never gets completed. All under the guise of “perfection.” In reality, you’re afraid to release the work, for fear of success, of failure, of rejection, of whatever you’re afraid of. Don’t get stuck there. Build a body of work. Only by actively producing new works can you build a body of work.

Most of us aren’t like Harper Lee, who published To Kill a Mockingbird in 1960 and released her second book, To Set a Watchman, this year, more than a half century later. That may have worked for her. But for you, and for me, we need to be producing more — a lot more.

This isn’t about simply churning out your art — books, songs, photography, paintings, whatever you do. But it is about the fact that we need to work in our art to get better at it, even if we start out with a healthy dose of talent. Plus, the more we produce, the more opportunities we give ourselves, as new clients, patrons, etc., can find and fall in love with our work.

Go for producing your work in a spirit of excellence, and go for getting it done and out. After all, you’ll never reach your greatness just by thinking about the work you want to do. You’ll only get there by actually doing it.

Life Law #5 for the Creative: You got talent, not lost half your brain.

Strategy: Embrace your abilities outside of your creative abilities.

For the longest, because I am a writer, I had this idea about myself that said I simply could not do numbers. After all, you’re either a words person or a numbers person, I thought. This limited view of myself resulted in more than a few “not-great” grades in math class in school and caused me to avoid the idea of business for quite some time once I was out of school. But in time, I learned that I could grasp numbers. I’m no rocket scientist, but I certainly realized I knew enough about numbers to figure out how to keep a positive bank balance. I discovered I had capability beyond my creativity and talent.

So do you. You don’t need to be a math wiz, but you are capable of grasping ideas and concepts thought to be beyond the grasp of creatives like us.

You’ll need to draw on other abilities outside of your creativity, if you want to take charge of your creative career and become a creative entrepreneur. Even if you choose to hire people to help you in certain areas (and, in time, you will need to do so, as your business grows), you’ll still want to have at least a working knowledge of how all areas of your business — especially the money side — work. After all, if you are taking ownership of your creative career, you can’t bury your head in only your art and leave everything else up to someone else.

You have a gift. Own it. And use it.

So there you go. Five life laws that can truly help you build a great career as a creative. If you already have someone who can help you in your creative business, then be sure to set a meeting soon (like yesterday) and see how best you can use these five laws. And if you need my help to take your gift to the right audience, click here.

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Monica Carter Tagore
Monica Carter Tagore is The Greatness Strategist. She helps you do something great. That most often relates to showing up in a bigger, better, bolder way in life — writing your book, spreading your purpose-driven message, monetizing your expertise or creativity. She helps you design your life and business to use your gifts in a way that speaks to who you truly are.

She lives in the Greater Los Angeles area with her husband and two sons.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, June 22, 2015


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


June 22, 2015


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, June 22, 2015

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


June 22, 2015

Dr. Johnny Lops
Author of

Reinvent Yourself
Essential Tools From A Brooklyn Psychiatrist Who Has Seen It All


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


  
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