Slavery Archives

Book Review: Having Her Say: A Compilation of Articles by and about Dr. Rosie—Time Keeper, Almanac and Score Keeper for Black America

by Dr. Rosie Milligan


Reviewed by Dr. Maxine Thompson


Having Her Say, Dr. Rosie Milligan’s 21st published book, is her much-awaited master piece. Part memoir, part business book, and part clarion call for Black people to wake up, Having Her Say will leave readers not only with something to think about, but with some action steps to take.


Dr. Milligan’s compilation of essays captures pivotal moments in Black History, such as witnessing the first Black President Barack Obama. Moreover, Dr. Milligan’s articles written since 1990, (which seemed controversial at the time,) prophesied the present condition of Black America. For instance, she predicted the plight of Black America and issued a warning that if Blacks did not change their attitude and economic direction, then history would repeat itself and Blacks would return to slavery, but in a more sophisticated form—having an illusion of freedom.


Given the current state of political anxiety and racial tension, these articles also provide a timely answer and direction as to where to go from here. These essays will help you look back to see where we have come from. Furthermore, they will give you a candid look at the historical moments that have impacted the lives of African Americans from the loss of Black businesses in Los Angeles, to the loss of social programs after the Watts riot in 1965, to the loss of civil rights through “the three strike” law. Dr. Milligan’s articles also chronicle the legal cases of Jena 6, and Christopher Dorner, and the LAPD saga. You feel like you’re getting a history lesson as you read the book, which is divided into sections with articles on Finances, Health, Sex, Family responsibilities to each other and Black Economic Empowerment. There are no-holds barred; she calls out ministers and politicians as to their accountability to “Black Folks.”


Find out what went into the making of the woman who boldly named herself, self-appointed “Mayor of South Central Los Angeles.” Follow Dr. Milligan’s journey from the South, where she describes herself as “an ex-cotton picker, a pea picker, a farmer, a hog slopper,” to South Los Angeles, where she has lived and worked in the community as an iconic leader, a publisher, an activist, and an entrepreneur of multiple businesses for the past 5 decades.


Described as a modern-day Harriet Tubman, Dr. Rosie Milligan has led the way to freedom for many Black businesses and writers through her mentoring and Black Writers on Tour conference, which, despite the economy, is celebrating its 21st year. She has been to Black writers what Barry Gordy’s Motown was to talented Black entertainers in the 1960s through 1980s, having published 350 authors through her company, the Professional Publishing House.


Learn within these pages, how like David going up against Goliath, Dr. Milligan has successfully fought the giants of oppression, racism and imperialism against great odds. Through this book, you will find the source of her strength. She has acted as a servant to God and her people throughout her adult life.


Having Her Say is filled with nuggets of wisdom, garnered from a life well-lived. This book is a conduit where readers will get an insight into how Dr. Milligan thinks and feels, as well as a national treasure, which will add to Dr. Milligan’s legacy by touching more lives.


This book should be in every Black person’s library.


Book is available in hardback and paper back at www.drrosie.com, Express Yourself Book Store, 1425 W. Manchester Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90047 323-750-3592


At Online Sellers.

Reviewed by:


Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, December 5, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


December 5, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, December 5, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


December 5, 2016



Natashia Deon
Debut Best-Selling Author of

Grace



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January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

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The Power of Voice II: An Artist in the Midst of War

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

“A time comes when silence is betrayal.’ Martin Luther King, Jr.”

“Those who commit the murders, write the reports.” Ida B. Wells

Here’s a Twitter post I tweeted on 9-24-16, which tells a story.

#TerrenceCrutcher #KeithLamontScott #TawonBoyd #RIP vs,#TheNewYorkBomber Still Alive #DylanRoof Terrorist Still Alive.

Malachi 4:1

Now a week later, 10-1-16, I retweeted filmmaker, activist, Tarique Nasheed’s tweet.

The LAPD just killed a Black man and wounded another, & now they immediately put on riot gear. But no one is rioting

Ida B. Wells was an activist and a journalist. According to Wikipedia: She was born into slavery in 1862, but as an adult, she documented lynching in the United States in the 1890s, showing that it was often used as a way to control or punish blacks who competed with whites, rather than being based on criminal acts by blacks, as was usually claimed by whites. Needless to say, she had a voice at a time when it was dangerous for a black person, a woman at that, to have a voice.

In that vein, I never realized how important my voice was until I lost mine after a thyroid surgery in 2008….

So I must speak out. Now we are living in an even more treacherous time, much of which is being documented through technology and social media. We can see the backlash that followed NFL player, Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the National Anthem in protest of the oppression of our people.

Whether the media forgets, we should never forget. Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Alva Braziel, Delrawn Smalls, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, and on the anniversary of Sandra Bland’s death, everything is the same. Let’s not forget Trayvon Martin, either. Do you recall any convictions for these murder victims? Do you expect to see any convictions for the more recent murder victims, Alton Sterling, Philandro Castile, which were captured on video and live streamed for the world to see? Charles Kinsey, a behavior therapist, who was shot by police Monday, 7-18-16, with his hands held up in the air.Twenty-three-year-old mother, Koryn Gaines, and the shooting of her 5-year-old son? Since then these police shootings/beating/murder: Terrence Cruthcher, Keith Lamont Scott, Tawon Boyd. And, most recently, here near my home, on 10-1-16, the officer-involved shooting of 18-year-old, Carnel Snell, Jr, in Los Angeles. Just before that there was the shooting of a mentally ill Black man, Reginald Thomas in Pasadena. Also the shooting of another mentally ill, homeless Black man, Joseph Mann, in Sacramento, and another Black man, Alfred Olango in El Cajon, California. Will there be any convictions?

This is beyond unjust. What should we do as writers? We write. My business philosophy, taken from my former job at the Los Angeles County Department of Children Services, (and my 23 years experience as a social worker) is, “If you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen.” For example, if a child was injured or killed in a foster home, or in its parent’s home, and the authorities couldn’t find any documentation in your case, indicating you had made all reasonable efforts to supervise and protect that child, you were in deep trouble.

Likewise, if you don’t write or speak out about what you are seeing happening here in the United States, you are just as involved in the complicity of these crimes we see around us.

Our job, as a writer, involves taking a stand. What is going on in America is wrong. Systemic racism is wrong. This involves all of its offshoots—mass incarceration of Blacks, poverty, redlining, racial profiling, police brutality, miseducation, and lack of reparations for our ancestors who provided the free labor which built the wealth of this country.

As writers, we need to document. The power of the pen still reigns.

Let us never forget. If you don’t write it down, it didn’t happen. I always see it on a deeper level. Without writing our passage down, “we,” as a people of African descent, didn’t happen.

About the Blogger: Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent

Dr. Maxine Thompson
http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

Using Research to Find Topics for Your Stories


Through research you can find topics, subjects and ‘seeds’ for stories. Pick five different topics that interest you, and research them on the Internet, or through your local library. These topics can be virtually anything, as long as they interest you, and the information is available. Write brief summaries of specific pieces of information that you come across—seeds that could become the basis for future stories. After the summary, list things you’ve learned or thoughts that could form the basis of future stories.

Examples:

Through my research, I discovered old-fashioned practices for abortions, birth control and other home remedies during and after slavery. The deeper level of meaning was that life was almost so unbearable for Black women at that point in history that some women would rather abort using primitive methods and risk her life than bring another child into the world. There were even plantations where it appeared the women were barren, and that was not the case. They even knew how to use herbs to abort. I used the idea of old-fashioned, illegal abortion in The Ebony Tree. In my novel, Hostage of Lies, the blacksmith who was not branded because of his ability to work with horses, later exemplified a black man whose soul could not be branded, chained, or enslaved.

Topics I am currently researching: The North Carolina Sea Islands where the culture is similar to after slavery. The slave castles on the West Coast of Africa. Children who are reared in foster care, and its after effects. (This was the seed for my novels, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, LA Blues 3.) The coming of a military state or concentration camps in the United States.

Sometimes you can combine different story ideas for an interesting story.


Where Can You Begin?

Know your idea. Start with a “What if” premise. For instance, what if there was a secret conspiracy to put African Americans in concentration camps? (Author, John A. Williams, The Man Who Cried I am.)

You might bring a moment in history alive through weaving fact, poetic license and fancy. Use old newspapers to find out how people viewed the world in a different era. You can find these on microfiche at the library. Look for subjects of your interest such as animals such as ferrets, computer dating, the criminal justice system, the mass incarceration of Black men, mass shootings, ISIS, terrorists, serial killers, (particularly if you’re a mystery writer.) Go on field trips in your local area to add local color to your book. Go to travel agencies to get information for different locales your book, if you can’t visit a location. Or you can use mind mapping to use a non-linear approach to outlining your book’s significant details.

For mind mapping for subject ideas, you can find software at www.mindjet.com.

Therefore, there is never a shortage of ideas for your stories. When you hit a brick wall in your writing, you might just need to do more research.

Sign up for the free newsletter at http://www.maxinethompson.com or http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com.

About the Blogger: Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, blogger, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. As an editor, she has edited/ghostwritten numerous best-selling books (Including New York Times Best Selling books), for African Americans, including many books for men and women who are incarcerated in the prison system. In a down economy, as a literary agent, she has negotiated over 100 book deals for African Americans. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), a contributor to bestselling anthologies, Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club best-seller, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, Novellas, The Katrina Blues, and Capri’s Second Chance, contributor to anthology,Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a small Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012. LA Blues 3 was published in August 2013.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


July 18, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 18, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


July 18, 2016

Terrence R. McCrea
Author of

What Should We All Do After The Trayvon Martin Trial?


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


THE REAL KILLERS OF THE FIVE COPS IN DALLAS TEXAS

BY AN ELDER, DR. ROSIE MILLIGAN

The persons responsible for the loss of lives of the five policemen in Dallas, Texas are as follows: Those who continue to perpetuate institutionalized racism throughout America—in its schools, universities, legal and criminal justice system. This also includes every law enforcement officer—black, white and others—who stood by and said nothing, and did nothing, while white officers beat or killed black men unjustly. The racist defense and prosecuting attorney, every juror who stood up for the policemen who were guilty in taking the lives of black men—yes, you are the guilty ones. And if you have any conscience today, you should be haunted by the trigger pulled by the gunman on that dreadful evening July 7, 2016.

I have lived seventy years in America, and I am a third generation removed from slavery. I experience the past, the present and the future all in one. I have a glimpse of the future, which is based on the facts that the more things change, the more they stay the same. The black man/woman is just as enslaved today legally as in the past. The criminal justice system upholds the law when it comes to disregarding the black person as a human being—which appears to be legal.

My question to all non-blacks is: what if your men were being brutally and unjustly murdered at the rate black men are being murdered, how would you feel and what would you do? When I saw those cops on top of a black man—who was in a helpless position, then shot, I had a flashback. Pain gripped my abdomen. I thought about when I was young, living in Mississippi when white men would roll up on horses to a black person’s house and call for a father or a father’s son to come out the house so they could either beat him in the presence of his family, or kill him. Nothing was done to the killer then, and nothing is done, in most cases, now. After witnessing the black man, Alton Sterling, who was killed just recently, I cried, I cried and I cried.

We must all stand up, and speak up when injustice is done. Here is a good quote I read online. “The only thing necessary for the Triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” Remember, the crop we plant today, our children will be the reapers of it tomorrow. Is it the masses who want a race war, or is it just a few evil ones who are trying to ignite a race war? You may not witness a race war in your time, however, if things do not change, there will be one. Is this what you want your children to inherit from your wrong doings? Think. If you have any doubt about what I am saying to you, you had better ask your young people how they feel about what’s going on. You will be quite surprised.

Here is another quote I read online:

“Young whites do not ascribe to the notion ‘We want our country back.’ It’s the old evil power thirsty white folks. Young whites know that you evil ones have lied to them. Their association with blacks in school, in sports, etc., they know truth. And they want to be like blacks, they want to sing like us, dance like us, dress like us, preach and praise like us—don’t you get it? They want to live in peace as God would have it to be—can’t you see how many of them are marching in the Black Life Matters Movement? Does that tell you something?”

America, you have pushed blacks against the wall, and they have two choices: give in to the ills of society, or stand up and fight for themselves and for their children. You have created a monster in your own back yard. Many black men are in prison unjustly. They pled guilty to a felony because they did not have the money to hire an attorney to represent them. Upon their release, due to a felony, they cannot obtain federal/state assistance such as: low-income housing, food stamps, federal grants for education and cannot be caught in the presence of another felon—Oh, America, America the beautiful, what are you doing to black people? Where there is no justice, there will be no peace. Young blacks will not continue to take, and to put up with, the injustice and do nothing; they have been placed in a positon whereby they don’t have much to lose. The new culture, the new crop, would rather go down fighting than to stand still, do nothing and be killed.

Let me leave you with these words of wisdom: A house divided, cannot stand. An enemy inside of a house can destroy you quicker and faster than the enemy on the outside. America, we have enemies all around the world. If we are to survive, we must come together as one race. We can do better, and we must do better, starting today and henceforth.

Dr. Rosie Milligan, minister, author, senior estate planner, credit consultant, talk show host of Express Yourself Hour, owner of Professional Business Consulting Service, 1425 W. Manchester Ave. Ste. B, Los Angeles, CA 90047, 323-750-3592, drrosie@aol.com, www.Drrosie.com

Blog: The Importance of Black Literature (Originally published in 2000)

Taken from The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sells

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

http://amzn.to/1S2yid7

Although this is officially African American Music Appreciation month, I’d like to address something of equal importance—Black Literature. As an African American literary agent of over 13 years, and an editor of numerous bestselling Black novels and nonfiction for almost twenty years, I’m seeing a slowing of sales of Black books, which concerns me.

As authors of the African Diaspora, we can never get complacent. We need to continue to find ways to gain discoverability of our books. With the closing of Black book stores, the end of The Black Expressions Book Club (which was the Black equivalent of the Doubleday Book Club,) the rise of social media, and many other factors which have impacted our book sales, we have to continue to be creative. As African Americans, there is a reason we need to continue to write. Literature is a repository of our culture.

When I indie published my first novel, The Ebony Tree, in 1995, I’ll never forget how I found out later that my then, 23-year-old niece ran through the house and screamed with laughter, after she read the book. Now mind you, my niece had always been an avid reader of white romance novels since her early teens, but reading my book was like landing on Mars for her. She reportedly asked her mother, “Mama, did Aunt Maxine make this up? Did you guys actually ‘play white’?”

My sister-in-law told her, “Not only did we play white, we dreamed in white. All we ever saw in the books or on TV were white characters. It seemed like they had all the fun.”

Typically, most African Americans who grew up in the 50’s had pictures on the wall of white Jesus, white Santa Claus and even white angels. There was nothing in the media or in books that reflected the beauty of blackness. Needless to say, if there were any books beside the Bible, they were not Black books. It sent a silent message that Black was ugly and white was beautiful. This was as negative of an experience as when reading was forbidden to slaves.

Fast forward almost half a century. I know from rearing my children, who are now adults, that having had African American books and paintings in the home was, and remains, a good influence on their self-esteem and confidence. When a person sees himself reflected in the literature he or she reads, it indirectly helps build a better self-image. For in literature, we find our role models, our archetypes from which we can learn life lessons.

More specifically, in African American literature, the stories are relevant to the Black experience in this country. These experiences range from people coming from different socio-economic classes, from varying urban to country regions, to different professions. We often get the Alger Horatio rags-to-riches story to its reversal, the riches-to-rags story. Most of these stories make social commentaries on how we all play a part in the symphony of the American Dream.

“Black Writers on The Rise,” the headlines screamed and I believed them. At the time, we had a few growing websites, such as AALBC.com, and Black literature magazines such as Black Issues (now defunct, where my publishing company was featured in the July-August 2000 issue; then, in April 2001, my eBook company was featured in Black Enterprises), so I was encouraged.

After all, seeing the different genres of African American books in the local, predominantly Black book stores scattered throughout the LA area, (now, many of which have closed), when I attended my first Book Expo of America (formerly the Book Association of America) held in Los Angeles, California in late April 1999, I thought we had arrived. But I was in for a rude awakening. I had been lulled into a false sense of complacency that we, as African American writers, were being published at the same rate as mainstream books.

To say the least, I was disillusioned. Yes, The Book Expo of 1999 was a big eye-opener. The bad news was this: Our problems (as African American writers) were far from over. When I compared the books represented by the major publishers, I saw that the percentage of Black books was infinitesimally small compared to that of other races.

Not one to be a soothsayer, but I felt the number of African American books could disappear like they did after the Harlem Renaissance, after the late 40’s, and after the Revolutionary 60’s, if we didn’t take control of our own written words.

To that end, I launched the Maxine Thompson Literary Services in late 1998, where I began to edit African American literature. In 2002, I began hosting an Internet radio show for authors, which I have continued down to this day on Artistfirst.com. In 2003, I launched Maxine Thompson Literary Agency.

Even then, I saw the good news was this. The increase in the number of African American books could be attributed, by and large, not only to more Black publishing companies, Black editors and literary agents, but to indie-published books. Given the advent of desktop publishing, the Internet, more Black book clubs, then later, eBooks, IPhone, social media, many writers were taking control of our destines and empowering ourselves by publishing our own stories.

So consider these questions. What are other ways having more Black books have helped? Is it easier to get published by mainstream in 2016? Have things improved for us as Black writers, since the late 1980’s?

From the standpoint of a literary agent, I must say this.The picture is not as bright as things were before the recession of 2008.

Therefore, I’m coming up with new ways to market in a tight publishing market. But my answer is “Never give up.”

Why is indie-publishing so important, particularly for Black writers, if you can’t get your books published by mainstream?

To encourage other writers to pen their stories, here are some of the good things Black literature has brought to this country.

1. Salvation. We can redeem ourselves if we know enough about others who have gone through the fire.

2. Continuity with your ancestors. We have something no other nationality or race in America has—a history of slavery. This impacts our writing as does racism, discrimination, and third-class citizenship.

3. A reading audience who is eager to see stories that reflect their reality.

4. A way of restoring history which was not allowed to be written down in the past.

5. A way of lifting up the next generation through the printed word, in addition to our oral tradition, which is reflected in rap, Hip Hop, and Poetry.

6. A way of promoting racial understanding for other ethnic groups. Personally, I learn
a lot about other parts of the Diaspora when I read books by Haitian Americans, (Farming of the Bones, Edwidge Danticat) or when I read Chinese American literature, (Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan) or any other culture’s literature. (Remember I wrote this around 2000.)

Once, a teacher told me at a book signing, that a study was done at her school. It was found that all the little Black girls said that their image of beauty was still a blond, blue-eyed child or doll. Imagine! This was December 1999! (Sad to say, I understand things have not changed much since then, almost 20 years later.)

It reminded me of the tragic tale in Toni Morrison’s book, The Bluest Eye, where the scourged Black child, Pecola, went insane, all because she wanted blue eyes. This book’s setting was circa 1940.

My point is this. If we keep writing our stories down, we, as African American writers, may not ever have parity in the world of books. But, at the same time, we won’t have another generation of little Black girls playing white, like my friends and I did, with scarves and towels draped over our hair, which we felt wasn’t beautiful enough. Or perhaps, we won’t have little girls going crazy like the fictional Pecola did.

About the blogger:

Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell, a contributor to bestselling anthologies Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, a contributor to bestselling anthologies Secret Lovers, All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Kindle Bestseller). Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012.

Blog: Alex Haley’s TV Mini-Series “Roots” Now Redux

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

6-2-16

Yesterday, I was standing in line at the post office and the conversation turned to the new TV series, Roots. I had watched some of it on my tablet on the History Channel, but my preference is still for the original classic of Roots, which was groundbreaking in 1977 when I first saw it.

Everyone wanted to know why do they keep creating slavery shows or movies now.

Since that was the groups’ consensus, my opinion was why not? I was vocal about it.

Just as the Holocaust victims never let the world forget the Germans’ atrocities and have erected memorials of the concentration camps, (just to name some examples

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/history-of-the-holocaust-auschwitz-oven-factory-reopens-as-a-memorial-a-742013.html),
http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/MemorialSite/Jewish.html),
then why should we, as African Americans, forget the human atrocities done to us?

One reason we should never forget is because of long-overdue reparations.

The Jews and Native Americans will or have received reparations.

http://rollingout.com/2015/10/07/obama-administration-earmarks-12-million-reparations-holocaust-survivors/

http://www.prrac.org/full_text.php?%20text_id=649&item_id=6623&newsletter_id=17

http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/26/politics/american-indian-settlment/

Bottom line. Why haven’t we, as African Americans, whose ancestors’ free labor built the wealth of this country received our reparations?

If anything, we need more books and movies regarding what happened to our ancestors for over four hundred years in this country. Perhaps to that end, we will receive our reparations.

Why should the holocaust of 60 million and more Africans be forgotten?

Many young African Americans don’t even know their history. Too much of our history was lost due to the laws that banned reading and writing for slaves. (Oh, how I wish I knew what songs or stories they might have sung during the Middle Passage? How did they survive the voyage at all?)

The main thing that survived (besides a few precious books, such as Frederick Douglass’s autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave, and 12 Years A Slave: A True Story : Includes Interviews and Photographs of 30 Former Slaves Authored by Solomon Northrup,)
was the oral tradition.

Our oral tradition is the main vein we have back to the past, such as in Kunta Kinte’s story, which was handed down in Alex Haley’s family.

African Americans not wanting to remember our slave past reminds me of a saying that Harriet Tubman is reported to have said; “I I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”

There’s a saying, “If you don’t know your past you will keep repeating it.” (Look at the mass incarceration of African Americans.)

I am currently working on a historical fiction book, which is a prequel to my novel, Hostage of Lies. It has involved a lot of research into the slave ancestors’ past. I am following a story that was told to me by an octogenarian (now deceased) in 1995. I am looking for little known stories and facts to support this story.

  
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