Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows

This Week’s Guest – Monday, July 31, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


July 31, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Dr. Maxine Thompson will be the Guest – Monday, July 31, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the host or Dr. Maxine Thompson


July 31, 2017


July 31, 2017


Suzetta Perkins
Author of

Two Down: The Inconvenient Truth



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html

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Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 13, 2017


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


February 27, 2017


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 27, 2017

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


February 27, 2017


February 27, 2017


Dr. Maxine Thompson
Publisher, Author, Founder of

Maxine Thompson Literary and Educational Services
Author of
Affirmations and Essays for Melanoid People



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press

release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, November 7, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


November 7, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, November 7, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


November 7, 2016


November 7, 2016


Patricia G. Pope
Author of

The Bishop



Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


Blog: The Importance of Black Literature (Originally published in 2000)

Taken from The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sells

By Dr. Maxine Thompson

http://www.maxinethompson.com
http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com

http://amzn.to/1S2yid7

Although this is officially African American Music Appreciation month, I’d like to address something of equal importance—Black Literature. As an African American literary agent of over 13 years, and an editor of numerous bestselling Black novels and nonfiction for almost twenty years, I’m seeing a slowing of sales of Black books, which concerns me.

As authors of the African Diaspora, we can never get complacent. We need to continue to find ways to gain discoverability of our books. With the closing of Black book stores, the end of The Black Expressions Book Club (which was the Black equivalent of the Doubleday Book Club,) the rise of social media, and many other factors which have impacted our book sales, we have to continue to be creative. As African Americans, there is a reason we need to continue to write. Literature is a repository of our culture.

When I indie published my first novel, The Ebony Tree, in 1995, I’ll never forget how I found out later that my then, 23-year-old niece ran through the house and screamed with laughter, after she read the book. Now mind you, my niece had always been an avid reader of white romance novels since her early teens, but reading my book was like landing on Mars for her. She reportedly asked her mother, “Mama, did Aunt Maxine make this up? Did you guys actually ‘play white’?”

My sister-in-law told her, “Not only did we play white, we dreamed in white. All we ever saw in the books or on TV were white characters. It seemed like they had all the fun.”

Typically, most African Americans who grew up in the 50’s had pictures on the wall of white Jesus, white Santa Claus and even white angels. There was nothing in the media or in books that reflected the beauty of blackness. Needless to say, if there were any books beside the Bible, they were not Black books. It sent a silent message that Black was ugly and white was beautiful. This was as negative of an experience as when reading was forbidden to slaves.

Fast forward almost half a century. I know from rearing my children, who are now adults, that having had African American books and paintings in the home was, and remains, a good influence on their self-esteem and confidence. When a person sees himself reflected in the literature he or she reads, it indirectly helps build a better self-image. For in literature, we find our role models, our archetypes from which we can learn life lessons.

More specifically, in African American literature, the stories are relevant to the Black experience in this country. These experiences range from people coming from different socio-economic classes, from varying urban to country regions, to different professions. We often get the Alger Horatio rags-to-riches story to its reversal, the riches-to-rags story. Most of these stories make social commentaries on how we all play a part in the symphony of the American Dream.

“Black Writers on The Rise,” the headlines screamed and I believed them. At the time, we had a few growing websites, such as AALBC.com, and Black literature magazines such as Black Issues (now defunct, where my publishing company was featured in the July-August 2000 issue; then, in April 2001, my eBook company was featured in Black Enterprises), so I was encouraged.

After all, seeing the different genres of African American books in the local, predominantly Black book stores scattered throughout the LA area, (now, many of which have closed), when I attended my first Book Expo of America (formerly the Book Association of America) held in Los Angeles, California in late April 1999, I thought we had arrived. But I was in for a rude awakening. I had been lulled into a false sense of complacency that we, as African American writers, were being published at the same rate as mainstream books.

To say the least, I was disillusioned. Yes, The Book Expo of 1999 was a big eye-opener. The bad news was this: Our problems (as African American writers) were far from over. When I compared the books represented by the major publishers, I saw that the percentage of Black books was infinitesimally small compared to that of other races.

Not one to be a soothsayer, but I felt the number of African American books could disappear like they did after the Harlem Renaissance, after the late 40’s, and after the Revolutionary 60’s, if we didn’t take control of our own written words.

To that end, I launched the Maxine Thompson Literary Services in late 1998, where I began to edit African American literature. In 2002, I began hosting an Internet radio show for authors, which I have continued down to this day on Artistfirst.com. In 2003, I launched Maxine Thompson Literary Agency.

Even then, I saw the good news was this. The increase in the number of African American books could be attributed, by and large, not only to more Black publishing companies, Black editors and literary agents, but to indie-published books. Given the advent of desktop publishing, the Internet, more Black book clubs, then later, eBooks, IPhone, social media, many writers were taking control of our destines and empowering ourselves by publishing our own stories.

So consider these questions. What are other ways having more Black books have helped? Is it easier to get published by mainstream in 2016? Have things improved for us as Black writers, since the late 1980’s?

From the standpoint of a literary agent, I must say this.The picture is not as bright as things were before the recession of 2008.

Therefore, I’m coming up with new ways to market in a tight publishing market. But my answer is “Never give up.”

Why is indie-publishing so important, particularly for Black writers, if you can’t get your books published by mainstream?

To encourage other writers to pen their stories, here are some of the good things Black literature has brought to this country.

1. Salvation. We can redeem ourselves if we know enough about others who have gone through the fire.

2. Continuity with your ancestors. We have something no other nationality or race in America has—a history of slavery. This impacts our writing as does racism, discrimination, and third-class citizenship.

3. A reading audience who is eager to see stories that reflect their reality.

4. A way of restoring history which was not allowed to be written down in the past.

5. A way of lifting up the next generation through the printed word, in addition to our oral tradition, which is reflected in rap, Hip Hop, and Poetry.

6. A way of promoting racial understanding for other ethnic groups. Personally, I learn
a lot about other parts of the Diaspora when I read books by Haitian Americans, (Farming of the Bones, Edwidge Danticat) or when I read Chinese American literature, (Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan) or any other culture’s literature. (Remember I wrote this around 2000.)

Once, a teacher told me at a book signing, that a study was done at her school. It was found that all the little Black girls said that their image of beauty was still a blond, blue-eyed child or doll. Imagine! This was December 1999! (Sad to say, I understand things have not changed much since then, almost 20 years later.)

It reminded me of the tragic tale in Toni Morrison’s book, The Bluest Eye, where the scourged Black child, Pecola, went insane, all because she wanted blue eyes. This book’s setting was circa 1940.

My point is this. If we keep writing our stories down, we, as African American writers, may not ever have parity in the world of books. But, at the same time, we won’t have another generation of little Black girls playing white, like my friends and I did, with scarves and towels draped over our hair, which we felt wasn’t beautiful enough. Or perhaps, we won’t have little girls going crazy like the fictional Pecola did.

About the blogger:

Dr. Maxine Thompson is a novelist, poet, columnist, short story writer, book reviewer, an editor, ghostwriter, Internet Radio Show Host, and a Literary Agent. She is the author of Novels, The Ebony Tree, Hostage of Lies, LA Blues, LA Blues 2, and LA Blues 3, A Place Called Home (A Short Story Collection), The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell, a contributor to bestselling anthologies Secret Lovers, (A Black Expression Bestseller) All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Black Expression Book Club, and Kindle Bestseller).

She is also an ebook author of The Hush Hush Secrets of Writing Fiction That Sell 1, 2, The Hush Hush Secrets of Making Money as a Writer, The Hush Hush Secrets of Creating a Life You Love, a contributor to bestselling anthologies Secret Lovers, All in The Family, and Never Knew Love Like This Before, (Also a Kindle Bestseller). Proverbs for the People, and Editor/Contributor to anthology, Saturday Morning.

Her novels, The Ebony Tree, (Won a Pen Award in 1997), Hostage of Lies, (Voted a Best Book of 2009), LA Blues, (2011), and LA Blues II, (2012), which were featured in Black Expressions’ Catalog in August 2012.




Dr. Maxine Thompson Live Internet Radio Shows
This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 22, 2016


Maxine Thompson

Dr. Maxine Thompson,
Publisher, Literary Agent, Author, Host of Internet Show is cross-referenced to her other businesses

Dr. Maxine ThompsonArtist First Internet Radio


Dr. Maxine invites you to join her this week on her various shows where she will be speaking with some interesting people.


February 22, 2016


9:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time

This Week’s Guest – Monday, February 22, 2016

Email dj@artistfirst.com with questions for the author or Dr. Maxine Thompson


February 22, 2016

Christopher Emil Williams
Publisher, Author,
of Black Blue Bloods

Legacy of an African-American Plantation Owner


Listen to Archives: Replay

Sponsored by:


EXECUTIVE SPONSORS:

January 4, 2010

Dr. Maxine Thompson

Author of
Hostage of Lies

Voted A Best Book of 2009

EDC Creations
Black Pearl Magazine

Black Butterfly Press

If you are interested in becoming a guest and/or a sponsor you may visit:

www.maxinethompson.com
,

www.maxinethompson.com/artistfirst.html for available dates
or via e-mail: maxtho@aol.com

>Home

This press release may be viewed with links at www.maxinethompson.com/pressrelease.html


CALLING ALL AUTHORS—AND BUSINESS OWNERS! Get Ready For Black Writers On Tour 2016 And Southern California Black Business Expo All Under One Roof. Register before Feb. 10, 2016 and SAVE $$$. This is a great opportunity for authors wishing to gain exposure, attract new readers, sell books and business owners with product or services to gain exposure, acquire new customers, make sales and expand your bottom line—more profits for 2016. Writers’ and business seminars—free for exhibitors—a $150.00 value. The more you learn, the more you can earn. You can give your seminar ticket to a special client as a promotional tool.www.blackwritersontour.com, 323-750-3592—Blackwritersontour@yahoo.com.

Mark the date, Saturday April 30, 2016. Employment is creeping back up, salaries are increasing, gas prices are down, and people are back to feeling good about spending again. The Black Life Matters Movement is raising consciousness to the facts that economics and literacy matters. The multiple tragic incidents in this country have inspired Black America to re-think how and who they spend their dollars with. Blacks are looking for black owned businesses to do business with—so why not your books or business? People are still looking for a great book to read and they are looking for children books that are a reflection of their ethnicity and culture.

Black Writers On Tour and Southern California Black Business Expo are designed to connect writers with readers and business owners to new customers and business to business support. Authors will be armed with current information regarding the publishing industry and the new trends. Business owners will learn: What you need to know about acquiring capital for your business, Recordkeeping and tax compliance, How to make your web site a serious marketing tool, and How to attract more customers nationwide via Social Media (If the US can do business with China, etc., you can do business with people in other states and globally—think outside the box) There are many authors and businesses who are doing well and they are the ones who keep abreast of what’s happening in the industry and they make themselves visible. If the public do not know that you have a book/business they can’t purchase from you. BLACK OWNED BUSINESSES ARE THE BEST KEPT SECRET IN TOWN—IT’S TIME TO COME OUT OF THE CLOSET AND GROW YOUR BUSINESS NOW!

If you are an exhibitor, all seminars are free for you. The general admission is free and you can bring as many people as you like to help. We distribute 50,000 colored flyers to places such as: Colleges, Universities, Schools, Businesses, Churches and Via US Postal Service-Door-To-Door. Other marketing such as: radio advertisement on 94.7 The Wave and KJLH Radio 102.3, extensive social media marketing, and newspaper advertisement. Many churches have agreed to help.

IT’S THE START OF SOMETHING BIG! BLACK WRITERS AND THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BLACK BUSINESS EXPO SHOWCASING ALL UNDER ONE ROOF. THIS IS GOING TO BE THE LARGEST EVER!

BLACK WRITERS ON TOUR 2016 & SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BLACK BUSINESS EXPO – SATURDAY, APRIL 30TH, 2016

Literacy Is Everybody’s Business. Who Will Tell Our Story?

BLACKWRITERSONTOUR.COM|BY ARELI WEB DESIGN/SHENITA MOORE

September 13, 2013 at 9:40am

LA Blues

By: Maxine Thompson

Meet Zipporah, “Z” Saldano a 21st Century Pam Grier. If you grew up in the 70’s and watched actress Pam Grier play the role of Foxy Brown a strong, sexy, African-American crime detective, then you will love this crime novel LA Blues written by Maxine Thompson. If you didn’t grow up in the seventies and never watched the crime drama, you will fall in love with Zipporah Saldano in LA Blues.

Zipporah an uncommon and unlikely LAPD officer grew up as a foster-care child in the impoverished, and violent neighbors in one of the richest cities in America – Los Angeles, California. After years on the force Z has seen so much gang related violence, police corruption, and domestic violence that she succumbs to the vice of alcoholism as a means of coping with the duties of her job.

However, her addiction catches up with her when she and her partner are ambushed in a shoot out on the streets of LA. Forced to resign or be fired, Z is left broken, beaten and battered by her own demons until her teenage nephew Trayvon is shot and killed on his way to school. Angered by the senseless shooting, Z decides to start her own P.I. Firm and use her skills and training as a police officer to find out who shot and killed her nephew.

With all of the controversy over the real life shooting of Trayvon Martin in Florida by George Zimmerman, LA Blues (which was written and published before Trayvon Martin was killed), seems prophetic and a little eerie at times because of the similarities of the events.

However, author Maxine Thompson weaves a story with genuine street credibility, gang violence, and drug addiction that touches the soul of every character in the story. The old cliche that “art imitates life” applies to this well written and crafted crime novel. BRAVO!!!!!!

Reviewed by:

Anfra Boyd

Editor-n-Chief

YAMS Magazine

Dear Author:

Let’s make this the largest event ever for Los Angeles. We can do it. The more people we get to the conference, it’s a win-win for all. This is a cultural event whereby there is something for everybody. Starting today, begin posting a message on Facebook every two days and ask you family and friends to do the same. We will do radio and newspaper advertisement, however, as we know there are so many people who do not listen to the radio regularly or pick up the newspaper regularly. So let’s cover all bases. Let’s put our literary works in the face of thousands.

FACEBOOK POSTINGS FOR Black Writers On Tour 2013 Just COPY AND PASTE THIS MESSAGE BELOW

Join me at The Black Writers On Tour Conference, I will be signing my book, April 27, 2013 from 9 to 6 pm at the Carson Community Center, 801 E. Carson St., Carson, CA. General Admission is free, free parking, free general public seminars/panels. There are workshops for writers and aspiring writers. Come and learn how to write and publish your book. 323-750-3592, www.blackwritersontour.com

ŸBlack Writers On Tour Sat. Apr. 27, 2013, 9 to 6p.m, Carson Community Center 801 E. Carson St. Carson, CA. Something for everybody. General admission is FREE, FREE parking, FREE writing class for children ages 10-15—cash prizes, 7 FREE seminars/panels for the public. Poetry Jam Competition – Win Cash; 12 seminars for writers/aspiring writers. Learn how to write your book and much more. For Writers’seminar tickets call: 323-750-3592. Or visit Classic One Books & Herbs, 1425 W. Manchester Ave., Ste. B, Los Angeles, California 90047. Credit cards accepted. For seminar schedule visit, www.blackwritersontour.com.

ŸBlack Writers On Tour 2013 Writer’s Conference “Literacy Is Everybody’s Business: Who Will and Who Should Tell Our Story.”April 27, 2013, 9 to 6 p.m, Carson Community Center, 801 E. Carson St., Carson, CA. General Admission is free, free parking. Free Writing Class for Children ages 10-15, they will be the ones to preserve our history and culture—so teach them to write now. 323-750-3592, www.blackwritersontour.com

ŸBlack Writers On Tour Conference, Sat. April 27, 2013. Meet over 100 authors in one setting. Chat with Fiction, Non-Fiction, Self-Help, Christian Writers, Children Writers, Poets, etc. Free exhibits throughout the day. General Admission is free with free parking. There are 12 seminars for writers and aspiring writers. 323-750-3592, www.blackwritersontour.com

“Show me your friends, and I’ll tell you who you are,” a special co-worker once told me. First, let me explain what special means. In Ebonics, we’ll say, ”She’s a special case.” Or if someone is not dealing with a full deck, but yet are loveable, we’ll say, ”She’s special.” So as you see, this was a ”gem” spoken out of a ‘’special” person’s mouth.
Although, at the time, I didn’t quite understand what she meant, I now know what she was talking about is called ”character.” In life, this could be a bad thing, but in fiction this is a good thing. Nothing works better for memorable fiction than strong characters with flaws. To get to the point, how does one create memorable characters? Sol Stein, in his book, Stein On Writing, points out that eccentricity is at the heart of all strong characterizations. In short, the most effective characters in fiction are to some degree bizarre.
Character is an essential part of the best fiction. Think of all the memorable characters in fiction. When you think of the books whose characters resound in your head, you don’t think about, well this happened and that happened, (plot), you generally think of who the protagonist was. Words such as ”Scrooge,” ”Pollyanna,” and even ”Uncle Tom” developed in our culture to express a personality, an outlook, a character trait. And in spite of my dislike for the Antebellum South, from my first reading at fifteen, Scarlettt O’Hara and Rhett Butler stenciled a place in my memory as colorful characters. (Who can ever forget Rhett Butler’s last sardonic words, ”My dear, I don’t give a d–?.”
As an African American, I grew up during the 50’s with no role models in my fiction. No archetypes that had any relevancy to my life. But now, I–and readers from all races– are blessed with a list of memorable Afrocentric characters. Janie ( who left 3 husbands), creator, Zora Neale Hurston. Sula, Milkman. Pilate. Sethe (who cut her baby’s throat rather than see her back in slavery). Creator, Toni Morrison. Nana Pouissant (who built bottle trees to protect her family), creator, Julie Dash/ Daughters of the Dust. Likewise, I’m hoping that my fictional characters–Jewel, Big Mama Lily, Nefertiti, Solly, Pharaoh and Reverend–will one day also become household names in the literary corridors of my reader’s mind.
Eccentricity has frequently been at the heart of strong characterization for good reason. Ordinariness is what readers have enough of in life. The most effective characters have profound roots in human behavior. Their richest feelings may be similar to those held by many others. However, as characters their eccentricities dominate the readers first view of them. The first time I encountered this is through the character of Pilate, from Song of Solomon. She has no navel, yet has the ability to communicate with her dead father. I am still haunted by her dying
Another reason character is so important in plotting your fiction is that people are different. The same tragic event can happen to two people and have different effects. One person can lose his job and never bounce back, and another will be galvanized by the same event. These are the types of points of departure you can examine in fiction through your characters.
These are the three major techniques I think will make the difference in creating memorable characters who leap off the page.
• 1) Point of view. Even if the character is eccentric, you should make the reader understand his world view.
• 2) Specificity in Details. Develop your character’s quirks, habits, motivations, and hobbies.
• 3) Challenges. Fiction that takes risks and challenges our smug assumptions about life.
Don’t just write about normal situations. Examine the human hearts and the depths of what people will go when faced with moral dilemmas. What will a mother do when she is broke and hungry and has children to feed?
To distinguish between plot-driven fiction and character-driven fiction is the same distinction you find between popular movies and serious movies. The former categories often satisfies you, but, like Chinese food, can leave you ravenous after a few hours. Character-driven fiction/movies will stick to your ribs like ‘’soul food.” It will make you examine the human heart and condition. Most of all, it often disturbs you like the book and movie, Beloved, yet you will find yourself driven to read these same books over and over.

L.A. Blues is Maxine Thompson’s masterpiece. Told in first person by main character, “Z” short for Zipporah Saldono, you were witness to life in the mean streets of modern day Los Angeles with its overwhelming serving of gangs and drugs and, of course, a corrupt police department. You couldn’t help but root for “Z” with the opening scene, a young lady trying to move past her generational curse by bettering herself but is almost raped in an environment that had claimed her family, although she’s rescued by a passerby who becomes a pivotal person in her life years later.

As an abandoned and orphaned child, she wants to do better…she wants to make something of her life and reunite with her younger siblings–with her father having been killed for protecting her, her mother in prison for supposedly killing the man who killed Z’s father, and her brother, a notorius drug dealer in prison. But the life of a cop may not be the best coping mechanism as Z is reminded on too many occasions of what her life was like growing up as she hauls in drug dealers, gang bangers, and the other elements of the streets. And then she finds herself a target, the reason not immediately apparent but is somehow connected with the slaying of her partner.

There are so many elements to Z that most people can identify with. I was drawn to her resolve to fight when she was thrown off the force and had taken to the bottle to relieve the stress. Having her foster mother in her life was was a healing force and through all of her struggles it appears Z found what looks like real love.

This is a gripping tale that is so vivid it almost feels as if you’re living it. I was there every moment with Z, trying to protect her from the rapists, shielding her from the volley of bullets that ended her partner’s life, pulling her up from her drunken stupor to breathe life into her again…admonishing her not to give up and let Romero have a chance, to embrace her mother…especially when she learns the truth of her imprisonment, and being the best friend she could to Chica and Haviland. EXCELLENT READ!!’

Book Reviewer: Suzetta Perkins, Bestselling Author, Look for Upcoming Release, Betrayed. It’s a pageturner and a tearjerker.

http://www.suzettaperkins.com

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